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I have a deferred AFTER UPDATE trigger on a table, set to fire when a certain column is updated. It's an integer type I'm using as a counter.

I'm not 100% certain but it looks like if I increment that particular column 100 times during a transaction, the trigger is queued up and executed 100 times at the end of the transaction.

I would like the trigger to only be scheduled once per row no matter how many times I've incremented that column.

Can I do that somehow? Alternatively if triggered triggers must queue up regardless if they are duplicates, can I clear this queue during the first run of the trigger?

Version of Postgres is 9.1. Here's what I got:

CREATE CONSTRAINT TRIGGER counter_change
    AFTER UPDATE OF "Counter" ON "table"
    DEFERRABLE INITIALLY DEFERRED
    FOR EACH ROW
    EXECUTE PROCEDURE counter_change();

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION counter_change()
    RETURNS trigger
    LANGUAGE plpgsql
    AS $$
DECLARE
BEGIN

PERFORM some_expensive_procedure(NEW."id");

RETURN NEW;

END;$$;
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Your version of Postgres would help. Also the (basic) code of your trigger and trigger function. –  Erwin Brandstetter Jan 21 '12 at 1:07
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is a tricky problem. But it can be done with per-column triggers and conditional trigger execution introduced in PostgreSQL 9.0.

You need an "updated" flag per row for this solution. Use a boolean column in the same table for simplicity. But it could be in another table or even a temporary table per transaction.

The expensive payload is executed once per row where the counter is updated (once or multiple time).

This should also perform well, because ...

  • ... it avoids multiple calls of triggers at the root (scales well)
  • ... does not change additional rows (minimize table bloat)
  • ... does not need expensive exception handling.

Consider the following

Demo

Tested in PostgreSQL 9.1 with a separate schema x as test environment.

Tables and dummy rows

-- DROP SCHEMA x;
CREATE SCHEMA x;

CREATE TABLE x.tbl (
 id int
,counter int
,trig_exec_count integer  -- for monitoring payload execution.
,updated bool);

Insert two rows to demonstrate it works with multiple rows:

INSERT INTO x.tbl VALUES
 (1, 0, 0, NULL)
,(2, 0, 0, NULL);

Trigger functions and Triggers

1.) Execute expensive payload

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION x.trg_upaft_counter_change_1()
    RETURNS trigger AS
$BODY$
BEGIN

 -- PERFORM some_expensive_procedure(NEW.id);
 -- Update trig_exec_count to count execution of expensive payload.
 -- Could be in another table, for simplicity, I use the same:

UPDATE x.tbl t
SET    trig_exec_count = trig_exec_count + 1
WHERE  t.id = NEW.id;

RETURN NULL;  -- RETURN value of AFTER trigger is ignored anyway

END;
$BODY$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;

2.) Flag row as updated.

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION x.trg_upaft_counter_change_2()
    RETURNS trigger AS
$BODY$
BEGIN

UPDATE x.tbl
SET    updated = TRUE
WHERE  id = NEW.id;
RETURN NULL;

END;
$BODY$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;

3.) Reset "updated" flag.

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION x.trg_upaft_counter_change_3()
    RETURNS trigger AS
$BODY$
BEGIN

UPDATE x.tbl
SET    updated = NULL
WHERE  id = NEW.id;
RETURN NULL;

END;
$BODY$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;

Trigger names are relevant! Called for the same event they are executed in alphabetical order.

1.) Payload, only if not "updated" yet:

CREATE CONSTRAINT TRIGGER upaft_counter_change_1
    AFTER UPDATE OF counter ON x.tbl
    DEFERRABLE INITIALLY DEFERRED
    FOR EACH ROW
    WHEN (NEW.updated IS NULL)
    EXECUTE PROCEDURE x.trg_upaft_counter_change_1();

2.) Flag row as updated, only if not "updated" yet:

CREATE TRIGGER upaft_counter_change_2   -- not deferred!
    AFTER UPDATE OF counter ON x.tbl
    FOR EACH ROW
    WHEN (NEW.updated IS NULL)
    EXECUTE PROCEDURE x.trg_upaft_counter_change_2();

3.) Reset Flag. No endless loop because of trigger condition.

CREATE CONSTRAINT TRIGGER upaft_counter_change_3
    AFTER UPDATE OF updated ON x.tbl
    DEFERRABLE INITIALLY DEFERRED
    FOR EACH ROW
    WHEN (NEW.updated)                 --
    EXECUTE PROCEDURE x.trg_upaft_counter_change_3();

Test

Run UPDATE & SELECT separately to see the deferred effect. If executed together (in one transaction) the SELECT will show the new tbl.counter but the old tbl2.trig_exec_count.

UPDATE x.tbl SET counter = counter + 1;

SELECT * FROM x.tbl;

Now, update the counter multiple times (in one transaction). The payload will only be executed once. Voilá!

UPDATE x.tbl SET counter = counter + 1;
UPDATE x.tbl SET counter = counter + 1;
UPDATE x.tbl SET counter = counter + 1;
UPDATE x.tbl SET counter = counter + 1;
UPDATE x.tbl SET counter = counter + 1;

SELECT * FROM x.tbl;
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+1 interesting approach –  pilcrow Jan 21 '12 at 15:58
    
I like this solution, thank you for your effort. –  jjames Jan 27 '12 at 5:12
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I don't know of a way to collapse trigger execution to once per (updated) row per transaction, but you can emulate this with a TEMPORARY ON COMMIT DROP table which tracks those modified rows and performs your expensive operation only once per row per tx:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION counter_change() RETURNS TRIGGER
AS $$
BEGIN
  -- If we're the first invocation of this trigger in this tx,
  -- make our scratch table.  Create unique index separately to
  -- suppress avoid NOTICEs without fiddling with log_min_messages
  BEGIN
    CREATE LOCAL TEMPORARY TABLE tbl_counter_tx_once
      ("id" AS_APPROPRIATE NOT NULL)
      ON COMMIT DROP;
    CREATE UNIQUE INDEX ON tbl_counter_tx_once AS ("id");
  EXCEPTION WHEN duplicate_table THEN
    NULL;
  END;

  -- If we're the first invocation in this tx *for this row*,
  -- then do our expensive operation.
  BEGIN
    INSERT INTO tbl_counter_tx_once ("id") VALUES (NEW."id");
    PERFORM SOME_EXPENSIVE_OPERATION_HERE(NEW."id");
  EXCEPTION WHEN unique_violation THEN
    NULL;
  END;

  RETURN NEW;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;

There's of course a risk of name collision with that temporary table, so choose judiciously.

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Exception handling is expensive and not needed. Consider CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS (new in 9.1) and IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT ..) THEN ...; INSERT INTO tbl ..; END IF;. Also LOCALis just a noise word in PostgreSQL. –  Erwin Brandstetter Jan 21 '12 at 15:28
    
Re: non-exception based handling, yes, there's more than one way to do it. (Indeed my first tested solution was CREATE IF NOT EXISTS.) Re: LOCAL, yes, I know, and here I think it reinforces the purpose of using this table. –  pilcrow Jan 21 '12 at 15:55
1  
+1 Aside from that your solution deserves an upvote, too. Advanced stuff. You could include the current transaction ID with txid_current() in the name of the temporary table. Would force you to use dynamic SQL with EXECUTE, though. OR, better yet, add a column xid to the temp table with a stable name, then you can avoid the problem with static SQL! –  Erwin Brandstetter Jan 21 '12 at 16:42
    
This seems kind of heavy with the new tables, indexes and exception handling, currently I'm at 200 transactions a second and climbing. Also I need it to run after all the work in the transaction is complete, not after the first insert on that particular table. Good technique to know though, thanks. –  jjames Jan 27 '12 at 5:18
    
Re: "seems kind of heavy," it may be, though I'd suggest profiling. Re: "I need it to run after ... the transaction," that's handled by the DEFERRABLEness of your trigger CONSTRAINT definition, not by the definition of the function to be executed. –  pilcrow Jan 27 '12 at 14:34
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Why would you perform per row when you clearly need a per statement trigger?

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