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Is there a simpler way to write this code in Clojure :

(def queue (atom {:top nil :queue PersistentQueue/EMPTY}))
(swap! queue #(hash-map :top nil :queue (conj (:queue %) "foo")))
(let [{:keys [top]} (swap! queue
                        #(hash-map 
                           :top (peek (:queue %)) 
                           :queue (pop (:queue %))))]
  (println top))

alternative way to write it would be :

(def queue (atom PersistentQueue/EMPTY))
(swap! queue conj "foo")
(let [top (atom nil)]
  (swap! queue 
         (fn [queue]
           (reset! top (peek queue))
           (pop queue)))
  (println @top))

That seems even worse.

Anyway I have a code which uses atoms for queuing a lot and using the former approach is making the code really confusing, I would expect there to be something like :

(swap! queue (fn [queue] (AtomSwapResult. atom-value return-value))

or some similar mechanism in the swap! function since it seems like the kind of thing you would want to do often (not even limited to queuing, I've hit several other use cases where it would be useful to return a different value, for eg. the old value that was swapped out) and it doesn't break the atom/swap! semantics.

Is there a way to do this in Clojure ?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted
(defn dequeue!
  [queue]
  (loop []
    (let [q     @queue
          value (peek q)
          nq    (pop q)]
      (if (compare-and-set! queue q nq)
        value
        (recur)))))

(def queue (atom clojure.lang.PersistentQueue/EMPTY))
(swap! queue conj :foo)
(swap! queue conj :bar)
(seq @queue)
(dequeue! queue)
(seq @queue)
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1  
lol I wrote CAS one first time I encountered the problem but thought it was too verbose and didn't consider separating it in a function - feeling pretty dumb right now :) –  Rafael Munitić Jan 20 '12 at 10:21
    
Note, that you likely cannot distinguish between nils from the queue and nils from an empty queue. Checking with count before dequeue! is not thread-safe. So beware the pitfalls. –  kotarak Jan 20 '12 at 10:36
    
Yup - remember that part too - if anyone cares - the first solution above can be modified to test if top key is present - and that is the empty queue signal. –  Rafael Munitić Jan 21 '12 at 4:48

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