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I have a table listing with a 'notes' field in each row. I'd like to be able to update these using ajax and display a little message once they have been updated, but I'm struggling to figure out the correct code.

My plan was to capture a key press, and pass the note ID into a timer, which would be reset every time the user presses a key so it will only run once they've stopped typing for 1 second. The problem is, with multiple notes on the page I need to pass it into an array and reset the timer on each one, if this is even possible?

Here's my code:

    var waitTime = 1000;
    var click = false;
    var timers = new Array();

    $('.notes').keyup(function(){

        var timerVariable = $(this).attr('id').split("-");
        timerVariable = timerVariable[0];
        timerVariable = timerVariable.replace('note', '');

        timers.push(timerVariable);
        timers[timerVariable] = timerVariable;

        if(click==false){
            var id = $(this).attr('id');
            if(click==false){
                click= true;
                timerVariable = setTimeout(function(){doneTyping(id)}, waitTime);
            }
        }
    });

    $('.notes').keydown(function(){
        for (var timer in timers) {
            clearTimeout(timer);
        }
        click = false;
    });

    function doneTyping (id) {
        var staffNo = id.split("-");
        staffNo = staffNo[0];
        staffNo = staffNo.replace('note', '');

        var data = 'data='+id+'&note='+$('#'+id).val();
        $.ajax({
            url: "update-notes.php", 
            type: "GET",       
            data: data,    
            cache: false,
            success: function (html) {
                jGrowlTheme('mono', 'Updated ' + staffNo, 'Thank you, the note has been updated.', 'tick.png');
            }
        });
    }

I'm wondering if the problem is maybe with the way I'm calling the for loop, or something else? Any advice would be very welcome, thank you!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It is not a direct answer to your problem but I would personally make a jquery plugin out of your code that you would use like this:

$('.note-fields').myNoteAjaxPlugin({ waitFor: '1000'  });

Each "note field" would have it's instance of the plugin encapsulating a timer dedicated for each field. No need to worry about storing in arrays and such.

There are plenty of plugin patterns and boilerplates out there like this one and this other one.

Here is a sample implementation. I've used the one boilerplate and merged it with the jquery ui bridge code (which checks for private methods, re-using a previous plugin instance or instantiating it correctly):

;(function ( $, window, document, undefined ) {

    // Create the defaults once
    var pluginName = 'myNoteAjaxPlugin',
        defaults = {
            waitFor: "1000",
        };

    // The actual plugin constructor
    function Plugin( element, options ) {

        this.element = element;
        this.$element = $(element);

        this.options = $.extend( {}, defaults, options) ;

        this._defaults = defaults;
        this._name = pluginName;

        this._timer = null;
        this._click = false;

        this._init();
    }

    Plugin.prototype._init = function () {

        var self = this;

        this.$element.keyup(function(e){

            if( self._click === false ){
                var id = self.element.id;
                if( self._click === false ){
                    self._click = true;
                    self._timer = setTimeout(function(){self._doneTyping(id)}, self.options.waitFor);
                }
            }
        });

        this.$element.keydown(function(e) {

            if (self._timer) {
                clearTimeout(self._timer);
            }
            self._click = false;

        });

    };

    Plugin.prototype._doneTyping = function(id) {

        alert('done typing');

    };

    $.fn[pluginName] = function( options ) {

        var isMethodCall = typeof options === "string",
            args = Array.prototype.slice.call( arguments, 1 ),
            returnValue = this;

        // allow multiple hashes to be passed on init
        options = !isMethodCall && args.length ?
            $.extend.apply( null, [ true, options ].concat(args) ) :
            options;

        // prevent calls to internal methods
        if ( isMethodCall && options.charAt( 0 ) === "_" ) {
            return returnValue;
        }

        if ( isMethodCall ) {
            this.each(function() {
                var instance = $.data( this, pluginName ),
                    methodValue = instance && $.isFunction( instance[options] ) ?
                        instance[ options ].apply( instance, args ) :
                        instance;

                if ( methodValue !== instance && methodValue !== undefined ) {
                    returnValue = methodValue;
                    return false;
                }
            });

        } else {
            this.each(function() {
                var instance = $.data( this, pluginName );
                if ( instance ) {
                    instance.option( options || {} )._init();
                } else {
                    $.data( this, pluginName , new Plugin( this , options) );
                }
            });
        }

        return returnValue;
    };

})( jQuery, window, document );


$('#myinput').myNoteAjaxPlugin({waitFor: '1500'});

Working DEMO

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This is a great solution, thank you - I've never created a function in jQuery before so it's really useful to see the boilerplates too. Thanks! –  xn dx Jan 20 '12 at 15:36
1  
You're welcome. I've added a working demo on jsfiddle. –  Didier Ghys Jan 20 '12 at 15:52
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This is how I do it:

var t;

$(document).ready(function() {

    $('#search_string').keyup(function() {

        clearTimeout (t);

        t = setTimeout('start_ajax()', 3000);

    });

});

start_ajax() {

    // Do AJAX.

}
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1  
did you not forget to set the timeout to t there? t = setTimeout('start_ajax()', 3000); ??? –  ppumkin Jan 20 '12 at 13:03
    
Thank you. This is a good solution but unfortunately I don't think it'll work easily with multiple timers and note fields like I have. –  xn dx Jan 20 '12 at 15:37
    
@ppumkin: Whoops. I did, fixed it. –  Jeffrey Jan 20 '12 at 21:15
    
@xndx: Perhaps it's better to use blur. ;) –  Jeffrey Jan 20 '12 at 21:15
    
I think you could be right, to be honest! Thank you :) –  xn dx Jan 23 '12 at 11:07
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The problem could very well be with this section of code:

$('.notes').keyup(function(){
    var timerVariable = $(this).attr('id').split("-");
    timerVariable = timerVariable[0];
    timerVariable = timerVariable.replace('note', '');

    timers.push(timerVariable);
    timers[timerVariable] = timerVariable;

    if(click==false){
        var id = $(this).attr('id');
        if(click==false){
            click= true;
            timerVariable = setTimeout(function(){doneTyping(id)}, waitTime);
        }
    }
});

I'm not really sure why you're doing timers.push(timerVariable); followed immediately by timers[timerVariable] = timerVariable; - they both add timerVariable into the array, just in (potentially?) different positions.

Also, while I know Javascript allows it, I still think changing the type of a variable is bad practice. Keep timerVariable as the index for your array, and create a new variable when calling setTimeout, rather than reusing timerVariable. It makes your code easier to follow, and reduces the possibility of errors being introduced.

And, finally, call setTimeout then add to your array. Your code isn't doing what you think it is - you're never actually adding the references created by your setTimeout calls to the array. Take a look at this jsFiddle to see what's actually happening.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, some great suggestions and explanations here, I shall look to apply this to my code. In particular the way I defined the timer with the push function, oops! –  xn dx Jan 20 '12 at 15:34
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Consider a more streamlined version of your code:

$('.notes')
.each(function () {
    $(this).data("serverState", {busy: false, date: new Date(), val: $(this).val() });
})
.bind("keyup cut paste", function() {
    var note = this, $note = $(this), serverState = $note.data("serverState");

    setTimeout(function () {
        var val = $note.val();

        if ( 
            !serverState.busy
            && new Date() - serverState.date > 1000 && val != serverState.val 
        ) {
            $.ajax({
                url: "update-notes.php", 
                type: "POST",       
                data: { data: note.id, note: val },
                cache: false,
                success: function (html) {
                    var staffNo = note.id.split("-")[0].replace('note', '');

                    serverState.date = new Date();
                    serverState.val  = val;
                    jGrowlTheme('mono', 'Updated ' + staffNo, 'Thank you, the note has been updated.', 'tick.png');
                },
                error: function () {
                    // handle update errors
                }, 
                complete: function () { 
                    serverState.busy = false;
                }
            });
        }
    }, 1000);
});
  • Initially, the current state of each <input> is saved as the serverState in the .data() cache.
  • Every event that can change the state of the input (i.e. keyup, cut, paste) triggers a delayed function call (1000ms).
  • The function checks whether there already is a request in progress (serverState.busy) and backs off if there is (there is no need to hammer the server with requests).
  • When it's time to send the changes to the server (1000ms after the last event) and the value actually has changed, it posts the new value to the server.
  • On Ajax success it sets serverState to the new value, on error it doesn't. Implement error handling for yourself.

So every key press triggers the function, but only 1000ms after the last key press that actually made a change to the value change is pushed to the server.

share|improve this answer
    
Many thanks, this is a very good improvement on my code in many ways and I like some of the ideas, but unfortunately I have the same problem where it's running the ajax on every single key press, meaning lots of messages for the user and lots of calls to the server –  xn dx Jan 20 '12 at 15:34
    
@xndx: It most certainly does not. It runs the Ajax 1 second after the last keypress that made a change. –  Tomalak Jan 20 '12 at 15:51
    
@xndx & Kyle Thanks for the edit! –  Tomalak Jan 20 '12 at 16:53
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