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I've read several articles and posts that say that lock(this), lock(typeof(MyType)), lock("a string") are all bad practice because another thread could lock on the same key and cause a deadlock. In order to understand this problem, I was trying to create some sample code to illustrate the deadlock but have been unable to wrap my head around this.

Can someone write a concise bit of code that illustrates this classic problem? Please keep it short, I can digest code in smaller chunks only.

Edit: I think lassevk sums it up well; that the real problem is that you have lost control over your locks. Once that happens, you cannot control the order the locks are called, and you are allowing a potential deadlock situation.

lock(this), lock(typeof(MyType)), etc all are situations where you have chosen a lock that is impossible to control.

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6 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

A deadlock will only occur if you have more than one lock. You need a situation where both threads hold a resource that the other needs (which means there has to be a least two resources, and the two threads have to attempt to acquire them in a different order)

So a simple example:

// thread 1
lock(typeof(int)) {
  Thread.Sleep(1000);
  lock(typeof(float)) {
    Console.WriteLine("Thread 1 got both locks");
  }

}

// thread 2
lock(typeof(float)) {
  Thread.Sleep(1000);
  lock(typeof(int)) {
    Console.WriteLine("Thread 2 got both locks");
  }
}

Assuming both threads are started within a second of each others, they will both have time to grab the first lock before anyone gets to the inner lock. Without the Sleep() call, one of the threads would most likely have time to get and release both locks before the other thread even got started.

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1  
aha, i was writing the exact same sample while you posted it:) but i have chosen long and int –  Maghis May 21 '09 at 17:41
2  
Very good example : A key element in creating a deadlock is locking on two resources in DIFFERENT orders. –  Andrei Rînea May 22 '09 at 12:08
    
Yes, that is the principle on which techniques like leveled lock are built and why they are very good for avoiding deadlocks. –  Maghis May 22 '09 at 12:23
    
+1 for the concise point : Remember that a deadlock will only occur if you have more than one lock. You need a situation where both threads hold a resource that the other needs (which means there has to be a least two resources, and the two threads have to attempt to acquire them in a different order). That is basic idea I was looking for. Now it is easy to analyse any multi-threaded code. –  Nawaz Jan 20 '12 at 5:38
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Sure, here you go.

Note that the common example for a deadlock is when you acquire multiple locks, and two or more threads end up waiting for each other.

For instance, two threads that locks like this:

Thread 1               Thread 2
 Lock "A"               Lock "B"
 Lock "B"               Lock "A" <-- both threads will stop dead here
                                     waiting for the lock to be come
                                     available.

However, in this example I didn't bother with that, I just let one thread lock indefinitely. You really don't want to loose control over your locks, so while this is a contrived example, the fact that the background thread can completely block the main thread like this, is bad.

using System;
using System.Threading;

namespace ConsoleApplication7
{
    public class Program
    {
        public static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            LockableClass lockable = new LockableClass();
            new Thread(new ParameterizedThreadStart(BackgroundMethod)).Start(lockable);
            Thread.Sleep(500);
            Console.Out.WriteLine("calling Reset");
            lockable.Reset();
        }

        private static void BackgroundMethod(Object lockable)
        {
            lock (lockable)
            {
                Console.Out.WriteLine("background thread got lock now");
                Thread.Sleep(Timeout.Infinite);
            }
        }
    }

    public class LockableClass
    {
        public Int32 Value1 { get; set; }
        public Int32 Value2 { get; set; }

        public void Reset()
        {
            Console.Out.WriteLine("attempting to lock on object");
            lock (this)
            {
                Console.Out.WriteLine("main thread got lock now");
                Value1 = 0;
                Value2 = 0;
            }
        }
    }

}
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2  
Comments to the other answers indicate, correctly, that a "deadlock" is what I described in the multiple locks scenario, but the main problem here is that you've lost control over your locks, not whether it's a real deadlock or not. You never want to lose control over your locks. –  Lasse V. Karlsen May 21 '09 at 17:29
    
Does a thread which is locked indefinitely is co considered as a deadlock situation ? –  Royi Namir Feb 22 '13 at 19:33
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The idea is that you should never lock on something you cannot control who has access to.

Type objects are singletons visible to every .net piece of code and you cannot control who locks on your "this" object from the outside.

Same thing is for strings: since strings are immutable, the framework keeps just one instance of "hard coded" strings and puts them in a pool (the string is said to be interned), if you write two times in your code the string "hello", you will always get the same abject.

Consider the following example: you wrote just Thread1 in your super private call, while Thread2 is called by some library you are using in a background thread...

void Thread1()
{
  lock (typeof(int))
  {
    Thread.Sleep(1000);
    lock (typeof(long))
      // do something
  }
}

void Thread2()
{
  lock (typeof(long))
  {
    Thread.Sleep(1000);
    lock (typeof(int))
      // do something
  }
}
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class Character
{
    public Character Other;
    public string Name;
    private object locker = new object();

    public Character(string name)
    {
        Name = name;
    }

    public void Go()
    {
        lock (locker)
        {
            Thread.Sleep(1000);
            Console.WriteLine("go in {0}", Name);
            Other.Go();
        }
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Character a = new Character("A");
        Character b = new Character("B");
        a.Other = b;
        b.Other = a;

        new Thread(a.Go).Start();
        b.Go();

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
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This is pretty standard bad-ness. Grabing the locks out of order and then sleeping with the lock. Two bad things to do. :)

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading;

namespace DeadLock
{
    public class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var ddt = new DontDoThat();

            ddt.Go();
        }
    }

    public class DontDoThat
    {
        private int _badSharedState = 0;
        private readonly object _lock1 = new object();
        private readonly object _lock2 = new object();

        public void Go()
        {
            new Thread(BadGuy1).Start();
            new Thread(BadGuy2).Start();

            Console.WriteLine("Leaving Go!");
        }

        public void BadGuy1()
        {
            lock (_lock1)
            {
                Thread.Sleep(100); // yeild with the lock is bad
                lock (_lock2)
                {
                    _badSharedState++;
                    Console.Write("From Bad Guy #1: {0})", _badSharedState );
                }
            }
        }
        public void BadGuy2()
        {
            lock (_lock2)
            {
                lock (_lock1)
                {
                    _badSharedState++;
                    Console.Write("From Bad Guy #2: {0})", _badSharedState);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
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The problem is that lock("a string") is locking on a singleton. This means that other objects that use the same lock could be an infinite wait.

for example:

using System;
using System.Threading;

namespace ThreadLock
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            lock ("my lock")
            {
                ManualResetEvent evt = new ManualResetEvent(false);
                WorkerObject worker = new WorkerObject(evt);
                Thread t = new Thread(new ThreadStart(worker.Work));
                t.Start();
                evt.WaitOne();
            }
        }
    }

    class WorkerObject
    {
        private ManualResetEvent _evt;
        public WorkerObject(ManualResetEvent evt)
        {
            _evt = evt;
        }
        public void Work()
        {
            lock ("my lock")
            {
                Console.WriteLine("worked.");
                _evt.Set();
            }
        }
    }
}

In this case, the calling code creates a lock on a string then makes a worker object. The worker object in Work() locks on the same string, which is a singleton in C#. It ends up in deadlock because the caller owns the lock and is waiting for a signal which will never come.

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1  
That won't deadlock, because the same thread is trying to execute both locsk, so there's no contention. If ob.Work() had been executed on another thread, it still wouldn't deadlock, because sooner or later, the first lock would get released. Both threads have to be blocked waiting for each others before it's a deadlock –  jalf May 21 '09 at 17:25
    
Correct - updated code. –  plinth May 21 '09 at 17:37
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