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Say I have a list:

l = [1, 2, 3, 4]

And I want to cycle through it. Normally, it would do something like this,

1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2...

I want to be able to start at a certain point in the cycle, not necessarily an index, but perhaps matching an element. Say I wanted to start at whatever element in the list ==4, then the output would be,

4, 1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3, 4, 1...

How can I accomplish this?

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5 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Look at itertools module. It provides all the necessary functionality.

from itertools import cycle, islice, dropwhile

L = [1, 2, 3, 4]

cycled = cycle(L)  # cycle thorugh the list 'L'
skipped = dropwhile(lambda x: x != 4, cycled)  # drop the values until x==4
sliced = islice(skipped, None, 10)  # take the first 10 values

result = list(sliced)  # create a list from iterator 'it'
print(result)

Output:

[4, 1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3, 4, 1]
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Use the arithmatic mod operator. Suppose you're starting from position k, then k should be updated like this:

k = (k + 1) % len(l)

If you want to start from a certain element, not index, you can always look it up like k = l.index(x) where x is the desired item.

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import itertools as it
l = [1, 2, 3, 4]
list(it.islice(it.dropwhile(lambda x: x != 4, it.cycle(l)),  10))
# returns: [4, 1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3, 4, 1]

so the iterator you want is:

it.dropwhile(lambda x: x != 4, it.cycle(l))
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4  
4 .__cmp__ also works instead of the ugly lambda –  gnibbler Jan 20 '12 at 11:51
    
@gnibbler It would take to put 4 in parenthesis (4).__cmp__. Otherwise it doesn't work (at least in Python 2.7.2). And with parenthesis it doesn't look that beautiful. –  ovgolovin Jan 20 '12 at 12:02
    
@gnibbler And as of Python 3 it would take to use __eq__ instead of __cmp__ (there is no __cmp__ as of the version 3). –  ovgolovin Jan 20 '12 at 12:06
2  
space between 4 and . ? what the heck is going on there? –  wim Jan 20 '12 at 14:36
6  
@wim, if you write 4.__cmp__ Python will parse it as a floating point number 4. followed by an identifier __cmp__ and that's a syntax error. 4 .__cmp__ on the other hand is the integer 4 followed by a period to indicate an attribute reference and the attribute __cmp__. –  Duncan Jan 20 '12 at 15:47
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I'm not such a big fan of importing modules when you can do things by your own in a couple of lines. Here's my solution without imports:

def cycle(my_list, start_at=None):
    start_at = 0 if start_at is None else my_list.index(start_at)
    while True:
        yield my_list[start_at]
        start_at = (start_at + 1) % len(my_list)

This will return an (infinite) iterator looping your list. To get the next element in the cycle you must use the next statement:

>>> it1 = cycle([101,102,103,104])
>>> next(it1), next(it1), next(it1), next(it1), next(it1)
(101, 102, 103, 104, 101) # and so on ...
>>> it1 = cycle([101,102,103,104], start_at=103)
>>> next(it1), next(it1), next(it1), next(it1), next(it1)
(103, 104, 101, 102, 103) # and so on ...
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2  
itertools is written in C. So, it's quite fast apart from its eloquence. –  ovgolovin Jan 20 '12 at 14:43
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Hm, http://docs.python.org/library/itertools.html#itertools.cycle doesn't have such a start element.

Maybe you just start the cycle anyway and drop the first elements that you don't like.

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