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I am trying to fire the event handler assigned to my timer mock. How can I test this private method here?

public interface ITimer
{
    void Start();
    double Interval { get; set; }
    event ElapsedEventHandler Elapsed;
}

Client class assigns an event handler to this object. I want to test the logic in this class.

_timer.Elapsed += ResetExpiredCounters;

And the assigned method is private

private void ResetExpiredCounters(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
    // do something
}

I want to have this event handler in my mock and run it somehow. How can I do this?

Update:

I realized I was raising the event before I assigned the event handler. I corrected that but I still get this error:

System.ArgumentException : Object of type 'System.EventArgs' cannot be converted 
to type 'System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs'.

I raise it like this:

_timer.Raise(item => item.Elapsed += null, ElapsedEventArgs.Empty);

or

_timer.Raise(item => item.Elapsed += null, EventArgs.Empty);

Both won't work.

Update:

Here's the thing that worked for me. Note that it's not useful if you are trying to pass info to event handler like Jon pointed out in comments. I am just using it to mock the wrapper for System.Timers.Timer class.

_timer.Raise(item => item.Elapsed += null, new EventArgs() as ElapsedEventArgs);

In the end, this won't help at all if you need to use event arguments since it will be always null. However, it's the only way since ElapsedEventArgs has only an internal constructor.

share|improve this question
    
"Object of type 'System.EventArgs' cannot be converted to type 'System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs'" - What part is unclear? – Groo Jan 20 '12 at 13:11
    
I still get that error even if I pass ElapsedEventArgs . How can I raise that event? – Ufuk Hacıoğulları Jan 20 '12 at 13:12
    
Is ElapsedEventHandler in your ITimer interface really System.Timers.ElapsedEventHandler? – Groo Jan 20 '12 at 13:15
    
@Groo Yes. Is Moq intercepting the parameters and creating new EventArgs or something? – Ufuk Hacıoğulları Jan 20 '12 at 13:20
1  
+1 for the question, but beware the accepted answer does not directly solve the problem - the 'new EventArgs() as ElapsedEventArgs' just passes in null, it's equivalent to passing '(ElapsedEventArgs)null' (as Jon points out). Perhaps you could put this in an answer rather than an update? – g t Jul 23 '12 at 14:13
up vote 5 down vote accepted

ElapsedEventArgs has a private constructor and can not be instantiated.

If you use:

timer.Raise(item => item.Elapsed += null, new EventArgs() as ElapsedEventArgs);

Then the handler will recevie a null parameter and lose its SignalTime property:

private void WhenTimerElapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
    // e is null.
}

You might want this parameter in some cases.

To solve this and make it more testable, I also created a wrapper for the ElapsedEventArgs, and made the interface use it:

public class TimeElapsedEventArgs : EventArgs
{
    public DateTime SignalTime { get; private set; }

    public TimeElapsedEventArgs() : this(DateTime.Now)
    {
    }

    public TimeElapsedEventArgs(DateTime signalTime)
    {
        this.SignalTime = signalTime;
    }
}

public interface IGenericTimer : IDisposable
{
    double IntervalInMilliseconds { get; set; }

    event EventHandler<TimerElapsedEventArgs> Elapsed;

    void StartTimer();

    void StopTimer();
}

The implementation will simply fire its own event getting the data from the real timer event:

public class TimerWrapper : IGenericTimer
{
    private readonly System.Timers.Timer timer;

    public event EventHandler<TimerElapsedEventArgs> Elapsed;

    public TimeSpan Interval
    {
        get
        {
            return this.timer.Interval;
        }
        set
        {
            this.timer.Interval = value;
        }
    }

    public TimerWrapper (TimeSpan interval)
    {
        this.timer = new System.Timers.Timer(interval.TotalMilliseconds) { Enabled = false };
        this.timer.Elapsed += this.WhenTimerElapsed;
    }

    private void WhenTimerElapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs elapsedEventArgs)
    {
        var handler = this.Elapsed;
        if (handler != null)
        {
            handler(this, new TimeElapsedEventArgs(elapsedEventArgs.SignalTime));
        }
    }

    public void StartTimer()
    {
        this.timer.Start();
    }

    public void StopTimer()
    {
        this.timer.Stop();
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        this.Dispose(true);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }

    protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (!this.disposed)
        {
            if (disposing)
            {
                this.timer.Elapsed -= this.WhenTimerElapsed;
                this.timer.Dispose();
            }

            this.disposed = true;
        }
    }
}

Now, you can simplify and improve the mock of this event:

timer.Raise(item => item.Elapsed += null, new TimeElapsedEventArgs());

var yesterday = DateTime.Now.AddDays(-1);
timer.Raise(item => item.Elapsed += null, new TimeElapsedEventArgs(yesterday));

Less code to write, easier to work with and completely decoupled from the framework.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Nice work... – Ufuk Hacıoğulları Jan 29 '14 at 8:55
1  
I simply can't get my head around why ElapsedEventArgs has a private constructor, necessitating this craziness. Anyway, thanks to both of you for the guidance. @JoanComasFdz, it would be helpful if you show the full implementation of TimerWrapper. I eventually sorted it out, but it took a few minutes. – Brett Jan 14 at 3:07
    
@Brett Code updated :) – JoanComasFdz Jan 14 at 8:48

The Moq QuickStart guide has a section on events. I think you'd use

mock.Raise(m => m.Elapsed += null, new ElapsedEventArgs(...));
share|improve this answer
    
Assigned handler from client class doesn't seem to run? Am I missing something? Shouldn't I be saying to mock the save the handler? – Ufuk Hacıoğulları Jan 20 '12 at 12:12
    
@UfukHacıoğulları: I believe the mock will just remember any handlers which are added. I would suggest that you start off by coming out of your real code, and just experiment with a sample event until you've proved how Moq works, then go back to your real code. – Jon Skeet Jan 20 '12 at 12:13
    
It doesn't seem to run event handler at all – Ufuk Hacıoğulları Jan 20 '12 at 12:30
4  
ElapsedEventArgs has no constructor. It won't compile but I was able cast new EventArgs as ElapsedEventArgs. I am updating your answer with that code. Is that okay ? – Ufuk Hacıoğulları Jan 20 '12 at 13:39
1  
@UfukHacıoğulları: If you can't create an ElapsedEventArgs, you can't easily test what happens when you fire an event, unfortunately. Looks like ElapsedEventArgs wasn't designed in a handy-for-testing way :( – Jon Skeet Jan 20 '12 at 13:48

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