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How should i go about doing something like:

IF the following select has any rows

SELECT ID, NAME FROM TABLE WHERE ID=@ID

then return that actual select, otherwise use another select statement.

I use somwthing like

IF EXISTS(SELECT ID, NAME FROM TABLE WHERE ID=@ID)
    SELECT ID, NAME FROM TABLE WHERE ID=@ID
ELSE
    SELECT QTY FROM TABLE WHERE ID=@ID

but this way i use the first select twice(once in the check and once the actual return record set.

share|improve this question
    
Does ID uniquely identify a row in TABLE? Is the ELSE condition selecting from the same table (if so, it will always evaluate as 0)? – Mark Bannister Jan 20 '12 at 12:31
up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's not as inefficient as you think. The EXISTS keyword means that the optimiser stops after 1 record is found.

But, if you really want to avoid repetition, you can do something like...

SELECT ID, NAME FROM TABLE WHERE ID=@ID

IF (@@rowcount = 0)
    SELECT QTY FROM TABLE WHERE ID=@ID

The problem here is that you now return up to 2 record sets to the client. The first of which my be empty (but field headers, etc, are still returned - just with 0 records).

You could avoid that by inserting results into a table variable, and only returning them to the client if there are any records. But I think it would be noticeably slower than just using EXISTS() like you already do.

share|improve this answer
    
The shape of the two result sets is different anyway, so no point trying to coerce them together. I was going to post this exact same thing. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 20 '12 at 13:03
    
I don't agree: EXISTS doesn't instruct the optimiser to do anything as specific as "stop after 1 record is found" (which obviously is impossible given the empty set :) – onedaywhen Jan 20 '12 at 13:49
    
@onedaywhen - All SQL is an expression of logic at a higher level of abstraction than that it is actually executed at. EXISTS() is syntax for 0 records equates to false, any more equates to true. SQL Server's optimiser is sufficiently efficient that it terminates execution if any record is ever found when providing results as part of an EXISTS() operation. In short, I dis-agree with your dis-agreement ;) – MatBailie Jan 20 '12 at 13:54
    
I agree with your last comment except for the last sentence :) – onedaywhen Jan 20 '12 at 14:15
DECLARE @ID INT, 
        @NAME VARCHAR(50);

SELECT @ID = ID, 
       @NAME = NAME 
FROM TABLE WHERE ID=@ID;

IF(@@ROWCOUNT = 1) 
  SELECT @ID AS ID, @NAME AS NAME
ELSE   
  SELECT QTY FROM TABLE WHERE ID=@ID
share|improve this answer
    
Good idea if the first select is guaranteed to return at most one row but won't work as written at the moment. You need to assign Name to a variable as well. And then have conditional logic to either select the variables or do the other select. And also this is MySQL syntax... – Martin Smith Jan 20 '12 at 12:28
    
Concerning MySQL: BUSTED! (But I assumed this to be universal) Please feel free to edit the syntax. Concerning the workflow: If the first Query does NOT return any rows, the second will. Oups! Just s/<>/= in the IF – Eugen Rieck Jan 20 '12 at 12:34
    
I took the liberty of editing it to work in SQL Server. Feel free to roll it back of course if I mangled your intent. – Martin Smith Jan 20 '12 at 12:37
    
@MartinSmith Thanks! What about the UNION version? – Eugen Rieck Jan 20 '12 at 12:39
    
@EugenRieck - UNION requires the same columns in all sets being UNIONed. – MatBailie Jan 20 '12 at 12:40

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