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I have some code looking like this:

using System.Threading;

public sealed class MyClass : IDisposable {
    private readonly Timer _timer;

   public MyClass() {
        _timer = new Timer(MyCallback);
   }

   public void SomeMethod() {
       lock (_timer) {
           ...
       }
   }

   ...

}

When I run code analysis (FxCop) I get the error message
CA2002 : Microsoft.Reliability : 'MyClass.SomeMethod' locks on a reference of type 'Timer'. Replace this with a lock against an object with strong-identity.

I found some documentation here.

An object is said to have a weak identity when it can be directly accessed across application domain boundaries.

How can my private timer object be accessed across appdomains? The only reason I can think of is if the Timer class wraps some global system handle but I don't understand how that handle is involved in the locking.

There is a list of weak classes on the documentation page but Timer is not mentioned. MemomoryStream is also not on the list but it is included in the examples. How can a local MemoryStream object be weak?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Timer extends MarshalByRefObject, which is why it's complaining, I suspect.

Personally I would recommend only locking on a private object which only your code can know about:

using System.Threading;

public sealed class MyClass : IDisposable {
    private readonly Timer _timer;
    private readonly object _mutex = new object();

   public MyClass() {
        _timer = new Timer(MyCallback);
   }

   public void SomeMethod() {
       lock (_mutex) {
           ...
       }
   }

   ...
}

That way you don't need to worry about whether Timer decides to lock on this etc.

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Thanks. I know how to get around it but don't understand why just some classes are listed if a potential lock on a public object is the problem. –  adrianm Jan 20 '12 at 13:49
    
@adrianm: Well, a potential lock on a public object is a problem in general; but locking on a MarshalByRefObject allows code running in one AppDomain to lock on an object in another AppDomain, so it's even more potentially problematic. –  Jon Skeet Jan 20 '12 at 13:54
    
Do you mean that my private MarshalByRefObject might make itself visible to other appdomains? Otherwise I don't understand how anyone else can use it in a lock. –  adrianm Jan 20 '12 at 14:18
    
@adrianm: I'm saying that it's possible to share MarshalByRefObjects objects across AppDomains, unlike most objects (which are copied when they're marshalled). I'm not saying it would happen with your code - but it's a risk which FxCop is highlighting. –  Jon Skeet Jan 20 '12 at 14:20
    
Still don't understand why a private MarshalByRefObject is worse than a private object, except the appdomain part, but I'll mark this as an answer. I think it is easier to get the lock right if I lock on the same object as the lock is protecting –  adrianm Jan 20 '12 at 14:49

You can't be sure that Timer doesn't lock itself on its instance. Its best to use just a new object().

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