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Currently my test automation uses remote DB to manage tests data. Actually we have a wrapper Webservice application hosted on server to do CRUD operation. I feel maintaining one more wrapper application is a overhead and want to move it to local DB.

I want to use SQLLite and which will be local to test automation. This can be checked-in to version control. Before every testsuite run the SQLite can be checked-out, tests will do CRUD and finally checked into version control like SVN or Perforec.

I want to get your thougts on pro and cons of having sqlite like database for test automation.

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Your tests should b populating the data they need for each test. Having one set of data that all tests run against is asking for trouble because you are coupling your tests together. Rather than having a binary SQLite file in your VC (which causes it's own set of problems), move the data inserts each test needs into that test's "setup" method. If you have the same set of data that each test needs, then move that out into a common method called in the setup method for each test.

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my question is more about where to keep the database instance than where in test suite to read / write data. should i replace instance running remotely accessible through webservice with local database. checkin could be part of build system than within test code. Hope I clear this time. –  Jenga Blocks Jan 20 '12 at 15:09
    
Use a local DB, since it will make testing faster by removing the network from the equation. That said, just create the database for the tests. There's no need to check the DB into the VC system, since you need to be able to build the DB from scratch for a real test anyways. –  cdeszaq Jan 20 '12 at 17:41

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