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i was just playing around with the ternary operator in my c class today. And found this odd behavior.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdbool.h>
main()
{
        int x='0' ? 1 : 2;
        printf("%i",x);
}

returns 1 as expected.But

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdbool.h>
main()
{
        int x='0'==true ? 1 : 2;
        printf("%i",x);
}

returns 2 while i expect it to return 1.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The value of '0' is not zero, it is whatever integer value encodes the digit '0' on your system. Typically 48 (in encodings borring from ASCII), which is then not equal to true when interpreted as an integer, which is 1.

So the first of your code lines is equivalent to

int x = (48 != 0) ? 1 : 2;

which clearly evaluates to 1. The second is

int x = (48 == 1) ? 1 : 2;

which just as clearly evaluates to 2.

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This would be why a good compiler with a warning for "condition is always true/false" is handy. If the compiler didn't warn for this, it is either poorly configured or poorly made. –  Lundin Jan 20 '12 at 15:13
1  
@Lundin: I disagree. There are plenty of cases where always-true or always-false expressions arise due to use of preprocessor macros and/or use of if instead of #ifdef for conditional compilation, in which case "condition is always X" warnings are usually spurious and mask real warnings that get lost between them. –  R.. Jan 20 '12 at 16:04

Maybe you are confusing '\0' and '0'

The value of the character constant

'\0'

is always 0 in C.

The value of the character constant

'0'

is implementation defined and depends on the character set. For ASCII, it is 0x30.

Also note that the macro true is defined to the value 1 and not 0.

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That's because (assuming ASCII) '0' represents the integer 0x30, i.e. 48, and true represents the integer 1. So they're not equal.

In C, any nonzero value is considered true, but true itself is 1, and 1 is what you get from any built-in Boolean test (for example, 0 == 0 is 1).

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(+1) This is why you will often see the idiom !!foo instead of foo == true to generate a bool indicating if foo has a nonzero value. –  Russell Zahniser Jan 20 '12 at 15:00
    
'0' does not get promoted to int; it inherently has type int. –  R.. Jan 20 '12 at 16:04
    
@R.: Good point, thank you. And the same is true of true, which is defined to expand to the integer constant 1. So there's really no type-promotion going on here at all. I've updated my answer accordingly. (Thanks again!) –  ruakh Jan 20 '12 at 16:09

true is defined as 1. '0' in ASCII is 0x30 which is not equal to 1.

Therefore the condition '0'==true is not true.

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That's because '0' != true. The boolean value gets promoted to an integer type and is equal to 1 whereas '0' is equal to 48

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'0' does not equal true, so the result of '0'==true is 0 (false). This is assigned to x and passed to the ternary operator, giving the result you see.

If you intended something else, you should use brackets to clarify the order of precedence you want, or break your code up into multiple statements.

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