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I want to create a Factory which returns dao-instance, depending on the Class clazz

Teammember, Scene and Equipment are my Model Classes.

My DAO's look like this:

public class JDBCTeammemberDAO implements JdbcDAO<Teammember>

my Factory looks like this:

public class DAOFactory {

    JdbcDAO createDAO(Class clazz) {
        if(clazz.equals(Teammember.class)) {
            return new JDBCTeammemberDAO();
        }
        if(clazz.equals(Scene.class)) {
            return new JDBCSceneDAO();
        }
        if(clazz.equals(Equipment.class)) {
            return new JDBCEquipmentDAO();
        }
        return null;

    }
}

I was thinking about switch and polymorphism, but I couldn't figure out how.

Basically I want to find the Implementation "SomeClass implements JdbcDAO"

My first approach was:

String name = clazz.getName().substring(6); // model.Teammember
Class<?> forName;
try {
    forName = Class.forName("dao.jdbc.JDBC" + name + "DAO");
    return (JdbcDAO) forName.newInstance();
} catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (InstantiationException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
} catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

but I don't feel good with handling this with String method. Besides, it doesn't work, if I have different Model and Dao names (like: JDBCMemberDAO instead of JDBCTeammemberDAO)

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I was in a similar situation and decided to use a Dao registry to handle the issue. Using the generic dao pattern @Perception mentioned:

public interface JdbcDAO<T> {
    T find(Long id) ;
    T create(T entity);
    T update(T entity);
    void delete(T entity);
}

public class JdbcDAOImpl<T> {
    this.clazz = clazz;
    DaoRegistry.register (clazz, this);
}

Then you can have your

   public class JDBCTeammemberDAO extend JdbcDAOImpl<TeamMember> {
       public class JDBCTeammemberDAO () {
          super(TeamMember.class);
       }
   }

DaoRegistry would look something like this:

public class DaoRegistry {
        private Map<Class, JdbcDAO> daoMap;

        public synchronized void register (Class type, JdbcDao dao) {
                if (!daoMap.containsKey(type))
                     daoMap.put (type, dao);
                else
                     logger.error ("Something is really wrong because you are creating another dao for this class.", e);

            }

        public JdbcDAO get(Class type) {return daoMap.get(type);
}

This is just the jest of it, you will need to make sure it is thread-safe. Hope this helps.

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If you don't mind a slight redesign, this problem is easy enough to solve with a little bit of Generics and Polymorphism:

public interface JdbcDAO<T> {
    T find(Long id) ;
    T create(T entity);
    T update(T entity);
    void delete(T entity);

    // Other common definitions
}

public class JdbcDAOImpl<T> {
    private Class<T> clazz;

    public JdbcDAOImpl() {
        super();
    }

    protected JdbcDAOImpl(Class<T> clazz) {
        super();
        this.clazz = clazz;
    }

    // Common implementation here
}

public class EquipmentDAO extends JdbcDAOImpl<Equipment> {
    public EquipmentDAO() {
        super(Equipment.class);
    }

    // Subclass specific implementation here
}

Rinse and repeat the specific impl for each of your Models and instantiate them directly (without use of a factory).

share|improve this answer
    
but how do I get the right DAO? By using JdbcDAOImpl<Equipment> equipmentDao = new JdbcDAOImpl<Equipment>() ? I want a factory for my service Class, which shouldn't care which one it gets. (especially if I want to mock it) –  MartinL Jan 20 '12 at 15:32
    
If having a factory is core to your design then the above code will not help you. But then I also question why you need Model specific DAO's as well. –  Perception Jan 20 '12 at 15:34
    
It's not my core. I need a way to mock/stub my Service-Classes. We learned it with factories only at school - if you have any better idea I'm up to you. –  MartinL Jan 20 '12 at 15:43

Well, you'll come to the point where you have to decide to use one of them, hence even if you use factory you have to supply what do you want to create. That's why I prefer Dependency Injection when using DAO classes.

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I'm not this far right now. I will do it in the future, but for now, I got some "older" Classes of mine and want to write some Tests for them. I head that DI is very powerfull and saves me a lot of time by... any link you can give me for an easy start? –  MartinL Jan 20 '12 at 15:41

Sormula works as you describe. It provides a method to get the "DAO" for a row/record class. See database.getTable(Inventory.class); in example 1. You don't need to write any DAO's.

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