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I want to do:

var MyModel = Backbone.model.extend({
  someProp: { ... },
  .
  .
  });

but have new MyModel().someProp === new MyModel().someProp return false

as if i had done

function MyModel() {
 this.someProp = {...};
}

I dont want to put the assignment this.someProp = {...}; in the initialize method because if i subclass MyModel, i ll have to repeat the assignment also in the subclass's initialize method again or remember to call the parents initialize from the children initialize every time i subclass, which it seems to me as a workaround rather than a solution. So, is there any other way?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If you want to use it for multiple models, then one solution would be to create a standalone function that takes care of it, then you can call that function from the model's initialize method.

Here's an example

function addInstanceProperties() {
  this.someProp = 'hello';
  this.otherProp = 'world';
}

var Parent = Backbone.Model.extend({
  initialize: function() {
    //have to use 'call' so the context is set to this model
    addInstanceProperties.call(this); 
  }
});

var Child = Parent.extend({
  initialize: function() {
    addInstanceProperties.call(this);
  }
});

However, this isn't any different than having the property assignments in the parent and having the child call the parent's initialize method. And there is less code involved.

var Parent = Backbone.Model.extend({
  initialize: function() {
    this.someProp = 'hello';
    this.otherProp = 'world';
  }
});

var Child = Parent.extend({
  initialize: function() {
    Parent.prototype.initialize.call(this);
  }
});

Unless you want to repeat the property assignments in each initialize method, this is really the only other way to do it in Javascript.

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yeah this is what i wanted to avoid.. –  Paralife Jan 21 '12 at 18:26
    
Unfortunately there's no way to avoid it in javascript –  Paul Jan 22 '12 at 5:35
    
Also, if i dont need to add anything to child initialization, i could also omit the child initialize definition, is this correct?I mean, If i dont override initialize in my childs, the parent's initialize will get called, correct? –  Paralife Jan 30 '12 at 12:47
    
Paralife - yes that's right –  Dan Smart Apr 18 '12 at 8:03
    
You can get around that line of code in the children if you want. Instead of initialize, define "additionalInitialize: function() {...}" in the child. Then, in the parent, do "initialize: function() {...; this.additionalInitialize();}" –  Varun Singh Aug 7 '12 at 19:04

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