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I need the number of line items per Order.

In this example, order 10 has 0 and order 11 has 2 lines.

IF  EXISTS (SELECT * FROM sys.objects WHERE object_id = OBJECT_ID(N'dbo.OrderDetail') AND type in (N'U'))
DROP TABLE OrderDetail
IF  EXISTS (SELECT * FROM sys.objects WHERE object_id = OBJECT_ID(N'dbo.OrderHeader') AND type in (N'U'))
DROP Table OrderHeader
GO
CREATE TABLE OrderHeader(
OrderHeaderID Int Primary Key Identity(10,1),
CustID Int)
GO
CREATE TABLE OrderDetail(
OrderDetailID Int Primary Key Identity(100,1),
OrderHeaderID Int REFERENCES OrderHeader,
ItemID Int)
GO
DECLARE @OrderHeaderID Int
INSERT INTO OrderHeader(CustID) VALUES(1000)
INSERT INTO OrderHeader(CustID) VALUES(1001)
SET @OrderHeaderID=SCOPE_IDENTITY()
INSERT INTO OrderDetail(OrderHeaderID,ItemID) VALUES(@OrderHeaderID,3)
INSERT INTO OrderDetail(OrderHeaderID,ItemID) VALUES(@OrderHeaderID,4)
GO
SELECT 
OrderDetailID,ItemID,OrderHeader.OrderHeaderID,CustID
FROM OrderDetail
JOIN OrderHeader
ON OrderDetail.OrderHeaderID=OrderHeader.OrderHeaderID
--

This is where I need help I need COUNT(*)

FROM OrderDetail WHERE OrderDetail.OrderHeaderID=OrderHeader.OrderHeaderID
SELECT OrderHeader.OrderHeaderID,CustID,CountOfOrderDetail
FROM OrderHeader
JOIN OrderDetail
ON OrderDetail.OrderHeaderID=OrderHeader.OrderHeaderID
share|improve this question
    
You're probably not going to get an answer for this question. It's not clear enough what the current behavior is or what the problem is. –  Allain Lalonde May 21 '09 at 18:40
    
Laughing out loud –  Phillip May 21 '09 at 19:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
select 
   ord.OrderHeaderID
   , count(det.ItemID)
from
   OrderHeader ord
left outer join
   OrderDetail det
on
   det.OrderHeaderID = ord.OrderHeaderID
group by
   ord.OrderHeaderID
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! Left Outer Join instead of inner join, but it worked for me. –  Phillip May 21 '09 at 18:47
    
yeah, I was just code reviewing myself and got that :) –  RSolberg May 21 '09 at 18:49
SELECT OrderHeader.ID, count(OrderDetail.ID)
FROM OrderHeader
LEFT JOIN OrderDetail
ON OrderDetail.OrderHeaderID=OrderHeader.OrderHeaderID
GROUP BY OrderHeader.ID
share|improve this answer

Like this?

SELECT 
  h.OrderHeaderID,
  h.CustID,
  COUNT(d.OrderHeaderID) CountOfOrderDetail
FROM 
  OrderHeader h
  LEFT JOIN OrderDetail d ON d.OrderHeaderID = h.OrderHeaderID
GROUP BY
  h.OrderHeaderID,
  h.CustID
share|improve this answer
    
Yes! That's it! Note: You missed assigning OrderDetail the letter D. But it worked for me. –  Phillip May 21 '09 at 18:46
    
Thanks, Corrected. –  Tomalak May 21 '09 at 19:42
    
Is there a way to mark 2 answers as both being correct? –  Phillip May 21 '09 at 19:47
    
No, there isn't. :-) But it's all right, up-voting good answers is sufficient. –  Tomalak May 22 '09 at 7:59

For future reference, you'll want to avoid using the following:

SELECT COUNT(*)
FROM OrderDetail
GROUP BY OrderHeaderID

It seems simple and elegant enough at first glance, but note that you'll miss any order from the OrderHeader table that has no orders. If it is important that they be represented (with a 0 for their count), see Tomalak or Autocracy's answers here and here.

Thanks to KM for pointing this out! (see comments below)

share|improve this answer
    
you'd miss orders with no details –  KM. May 21 '09 at 18:46
    
@KM Hmm, good point! Autocracy seems to have hit it by incorporating both tables and using the header table as the main one, and Tomalak went one step further. –  Sean Hanley May 21 '09 at 19:21

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