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I have a problem with OPT algorithm as valgrind is giving me error (Conditional jump or move depends on uninitialised value(s)) at line #87. I guess it has something to do with "break", is there a way to fix this?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <ctype.h>
#include <string.h>

int convert_one_char(const char c) {
  if( c == '0' ) return 0;
  else if( c == '1' ) return 1;
  else if( c == '2' ) return 2;
  else if( c == '3' ) return 3;
  else if( c == '4' ) return 4;
  else if( c == '5' ) return 5;
  else if( c == '6' ) return 6;
  else if( c == '7' ) return 7;
  else if( c == '8' ) return 8;
  else if( c == '9' ) return 9;
  else return -1;
}

void print(int n[], int size) {
  int i;
  for (i = 0; i < size; i++) {
    printf("%d", n[i]);
    if (i != size-1) {
      printf(" | ");
    } else {
      printf(": ");
    }
  }
}

int main (int argc, char *argv[]) {
  /* argc should be 3 */
  if (argc != 3) {
    printf("Napaka: Potrebna sta 2 argumenta!\n");
  } else  {
    FILE *file = freopen(argv[2], "r", stdin);
    if (file == 0) {
      printf( "Napaka: 404!\n" );
    } else {
      int num_count = 0, len = atoi(argv[1]), buff[80], i = 0;
      char c;

      /* read file contents */
      do {
        c = getchar();
        if (i%2 == 0 && isdigit(c)) {
          buff[num_count] = convert_one_char(c);
          num_count++;
        }
        i++;
      } while (c != EOF);

      /* print parsed file */
      printf("Referencni niz: ");
      for (i = 0; i < num_count; i++) printf("%d ", buff[i]);

      printf("\n");

      /* opt algorithm */

      int frameset[len];
      int flag[len];
      for (i = 0; i < len; i++) { 
        frameset[i] = -1;
        flag[i] = 0;
      }

      int j, s, k, tmp, available = 1, max = 0, pos, pf = 0;

      for (i = 0; i < len; i++) {
        frameset[i] = buff[i];
        print(frameset, len);
        printf("Vstavim %d\n", buff[i]);
        pf++;
      }

      while (i < num_count) {
        max = 0;
        for (k = 0; k < len; k++) if (frameset[k] == buff[i]) available = 0;

        if(available == 1) {
          for(j = 0; j < len; j++) {

            for(s = i+1; s >= 0; s++) {
              if(frameset[j] == buff[s]) {
                flag[j] = s; // <<< line 87
                break;
              }

              if(s >= num_count) {
                flag[j] = 100;
                break;
              }
            }
          }
          for(k = 0; k < len; k++) {
            if (flag[k] > max) {
              max = flag[k];
              pos = k;
            }
          }


          frameset[pos] = buff[i];
          print(frameset, len);
          printf("Vstavim %d\n", buff[i]);

          pf++;
        } else {
          i++;
          available = 1;
        }
      }        

      printf("\n\nStevilo napak: %d\n", pf);
      fclose( file );
    }
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
Your convert_one_char could be much easier, just do c - '0', as it is thats some TDWTF code. –  Richard J. Ross III Jan 20 '12 at 16:26
    
You can compress convert_one_char() to: int convert_one_char(char c) { if (isdigit(c)) return c - '0'; else return -1; }. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 20 '12 at 16:28
1  
When you post something mentioning a line number, you should put a comment in the code denoting which line it's referring to. –  Dan Fego Jan 20 '12 at 16:28
    
Which is line 87? –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 20 '12 at 16:29
    
@JonathanLeffler: If we're into compressing (and I agree, that function badly needs it), I'd drop the else. No chance of second path being taken when preceded by a return, after all. –  unwind Jan 20 '12 at 16:32
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Seems like you need to initialize all elements of your buff[80] and frameset[len] to something.. maybe 0

Also you also need to ensure that len is not greater than 80 otherwise you will be reading outside of an array.

if(frameset[j] == buff[s]) {
                flag[j] = s;
                break;
              }
share|improve this answer
    
Initializing all elements of buff[80] solved my problem. Thanks a lot! –  c4rrt3r Jan 20 '12 at 22:24
    
I'd say that initializing buff[80] hid whatever the issue might have been by ensuring that everything was initialized even if not to a meaningful value. Obviously buff[s] isn't being set by your code. This will happen on the first s iteration if len == num_count - 1. Also, your s iteration is increasing when it looks like it should be decreasing. What are you trying to do with this code? –  Joshua Green Jan 21 '12 at 4:39
1  
You probably want to put the check if(s >= num_count) before the check if(frameset[j] == buff[s]) to avoid this valgrind warning. –  Joshua Green Jan 21 '12 at 4:42
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The for loop at line 85 looks strange. You are incrementing s, and continuing as long as it stays greater than 0. But i doesn't look negative to me, so s would always be greater than 0. Also, i doesn't look correctly initialized, as it is just set to len after the loop at line 71. Is that by design?

Basically, it looks as though you are comparing with buff[s], but you are incrementing s more than what you may have done when initializing buff.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, good catch. In particular s runs around until it is MAX_INT and then overflows. This is undefined behavior. –  Jens Gustedt Jan 20 '12 at 17:01
    
Actually when s >= num_count for loop breaks (num_count is number of parsed elements) –  c4rrt3r Jan 20 '12 at 22:18
    
Yes, it breaks, but only after performing the check if(frameset[j] == buff[s]). If len == num_count - 1, the first s value is len and hence this comparison requires accessing uninitialized memory. –  Joshua Green Jan 21 '12 at 4:44
    
Rather, the first s value is num_count. –  Joshua Green Jan 21 '12 at 4:55
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I think you have to initialize all your variables, as "int j, s, k, tmp, available = 1, max = 0, pos, pf = 0;" because you are using all those variables inside conditionals..

EDIT: it is also a good practice...

share|improve this answer
    
I disagree. If you initialize everything, you lose the chance to have valgrind catch bugs. Unless there's a meaningful starting value, I prefer to leave variables unset until necessary. (Pointers are an important exception since trying to access NULL will "predictably and safely" show that something is wrong [by causing a segmentation fault] while avoiding accidentally trashing someone else's memory.) –  Joshua Green Jan 21 '12 at 4:48
    
what i was meaning you can find here : faqs.org/docs/Linux-HOWTO/Valgrind-HOWTO.html sorry if it is only a link but a copy and paste will be too long.. look for this paragraph : "4.2.3.1. Use of uninitialized memory" –  andrea.marangoni Jan 27 '12 at 16:38
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