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I am bit surprised with different results for one of my simple simulation sample when I tried with normal for loop ( which is correct result) Vs Parallel For. Please help me to find what could be the reason. I observed that Parallel execution is so fast compare to normal.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace Simulation
{
    class Program
    {

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
       ParalelSimulation(); // result is .757056
       NormalSimulation();  // result is .508021 which is correct
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    static void ParalelSimulation()
    {
        DateTime startTime = DateTime.Now;

        int trails = 1000000;
        int numberofpeople = 23;
        Random rnd = new Random();
        int matches = 0;

        Parallel.For(0, trails, i =>
            {
                var taken = new List<int>();
                for (int k = 0; k < numberofpeople; k++)
                {
                   var day = rnd.Next(1, 365);
                    if (taken.Contains(day))
                    {
                        matches += 1;
                        break;
                    }
                    taken.Add(day);
                }
            }
        );
        Console.WriteLine((Convert.ToDouble(matches) / trails).ToString());
        TimeSpan ts = DateTime.Now.Subtract(startTime);
        Console.WriteLine("Paralel Time Elapsed: {0} Seconds:MilliSeconds", ts.Seconds + ":" + ts.Milliseconds);
    }
    static void NormalSimulation()
    {
        DateTime startTime = DateTime.Now;

        int trails = 1000000;
        int numberofpeople = 23;
        Random rnd = new Random();
        int matches = 0;

        for (int j = 0; j < trails; j++)
        {
            var taken = new List<int>();
            for (int i = 0; i < numberofpeople; i++)
            {
               var day = rnd.Next(1, 365);
                if (taken.Contains(day))
                {
                    matches += 1;
                    break;
                }
                taken.Add(day);
            }
        }
        Console.WriteLine((Convert.ToDouble(matches) / trails).ToString());
        TimeSpan ts = DateTime.Now.Subtract(startTime);
        Console.WriteLine(" Time Elapsed: {0} Seconds:MilliSeconds", ts.Seconds + ":" + ts.Milliseconds);
    }
}

}

Thanks in Advance

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The code contains a data race on the update of matches. If two threads do it simultaneously, both can read the same value of it (say, 10), then both increment it (to 11) and write the new value back. As a result, there will be less registered matches (in my example, 11 instead of 12). The solution is to use System.Threading.Interlocked for this variable.

Other issues I see:
- your serial loop includes an iteration for j equal to trails while the parallel loop does not (the end index is exclusive in Parallel.For);
- class Random might be not thread safe.


Update: I think you do not get the result you want with Drew Marsh's code because it does not provide enough randomization. Each of 1M experiments starts with exactly the same random number, because you initiate all local instances of Random with the default seed. Essentially, you repeat the same experiment 1M times, so the result is still skewed. To fix that, you need to seed each randomizer with a new value each time. Update: I was not totally correct here, as the default initialization uses system clock for the seed; however, MSDN warns that

because the clock has finite resolution, using the parameterless constructor to create different Random objects in close succession creates random number generators that produce identical sequences of random numbers.

So this still might be the reason of insufficient randomization, and with explicit seeds you might get better results. For example, initializing with the number of the outer loop iteration provided a good answer for me:

Parallel.For(0, trails + 1, j =>
{
    Random rnd = new Random(j); // initialized with different seed each time
    /* ... */          
});

However, I noticed that after the initialization of Random was moved into the loop, all the speedup was lost (on my Intel Core i5 laptop). Since I am not a C# expert, I do not know why; but I suppose that class Random might have some data shared by all instances with synchronization of access.


Update 2: With the use of ThreadLocal for keeping one instance of Random per thread, I've got both good accuracy and reasonable speedup:

ThreadLocal<Random> ThreadRnd = new ThreadLocal<Random>(() =>
{
    return new Random(Thread.CurrentThread.GetHashCode());
});
Parallel.For(0, trails + 1, j =>
{
    Random rnd = ThreadRnd.Value;
    /* ... */          
});

Notice how the per-thread randomizers are initialized with the hash code for the currently running instance of Thread.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Alexey. Thanks for your comments. I am sure your point is valid..but somehow I am getting more number of matches in my parallel compare to serial. could you point out any other issues?...thanks in advance. I have corrected iteration mismatch in both methods –  Justin Mathew Jan 20 '12 at 22:38
    
Hi Alexey. You are excellent....you solution worked perfectly. thank you so much. chat with you in future. –  Justin Mathew Jan 22 '12 at 21:53
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Few things:

  1. The Random class is not thread safe. You would need a new Random instance per worker thread.
  2. You're incrementing the matches variable in a non-thread safe way. You would want to use Interlocked.Increment(ref matches) to guarantee thread safety around incrementing the variable.
  3. Your for loop and your Parallel::For are not executing the exact same number of times because you do a <= in your for loop and Parallel::For's second parameter is exclusive, so you would need to add 1 to trails in that case to make them equivalent.

Try this:

static void ParalelSimulationNEW()
{
    DateTime startTime = DateTime.Now;

    int trails = 1000000;
    int numberofpeople = 23;
    int matches = 0;

    Parallel.For(0, trails + 1, _ =>
    {
        Random rnd = new Random();

        var taken = new List<int>();
        for(int k = 0; k < numberofpeople; k++)
        {
            var day = rnd.Next(1, 365);
            if(taken.Contains(day))
            {
                Interlocked.Increment(ref matches);
                break;
            }
            taken.Add(day);
        }
    });
    Console.WriteLine((Convert.ToDouble(matches) / trails).ToString());
    TimeSpan ts = DateTime.Now.Subtract(startTime);
    Console.WriteLine("Paralel Time Elapsed: {0} Seconds:MilliSeconds", ts.Seconds + ":" + ts.Milliseconds);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Drew, All your points are valid and thanks a lot for that. I copied new code but still I am wondering parallel method did not give same result as normal method gives. I doubt little more mistake is there in my Parallel method. I am not sure how random works each time if we create new instance, it will work but I am bit doubted was it work exactly like in my normal method. now result for parallel method is .548 and normal is .507. I would need to achieve .507 which is accurate...Could you think little more ..thanks for your review –  Justin Mathew Jan 20 '12 at 22:30
    
Are you saying that the results should be exactly the same every time? If I execute your "normal" implementation many diff times I get different results each time. They're always within a range, but... different none-the-less. Your original parallel implementation was always far off in terms of matching the "normal" implementation's values, but the new parallel implementation is a lot closer. Since I don't quite understand what the values of the algorithm are, I am not sure how to tell exactly what I'm looking for. –  Drew Marsh Jan 20 '12 at 22:40
    
Since it's a statistical algorithm, the results should not be absolutely the same as in the serial code. However a notable difference might come from lack of randomization in the algorithm, due to all instances of Random being initialized by default. I put more details in my answer. –  Alexey Kukanov Jan 21 '12 at 17:02
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