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I am facing a compilation error on using transform:

It is related to my previous question: C++: How to copy a string object to an int array?)

enter code here

 class BinaryCode {

    public:
            int get_digit(char c)
            {
                    return c-'0';
            }
            void decode(string decd)
            {
                    int i;

                    std::vector<int>decoded(decd.size());
                    std::transform(decd.begin(), decd.end(), decoded.begin(), get_digit);

                    int length=decoded.length();

The error is:

enter code here

[root@localhost topcoder]# g++ prog1.c
 prog1.c: In member function `void BinaryCode::decode(std::string)':
 prog1.c:20: error: argument of type `int (BinaryCode::)(char)' does not match `int (BinaryCode::*)(char)'

Can anyone please help me? I am using a gcc (g++) compiler.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The best IMHO would be to change the definition of

        int get_digit(char c)

to

        static int get_digit(char c)

It should work with this (static function). It is possible to transform using member functions, but it's slightly more complicated. Moreover, you don't need it.

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3  
This, or take it out of the class entirely. –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 20 '12 at 17:04
    
Ahh..it worked. Thanks a ton. But why not non-static member function can be taken in last parameter? –  kingsmasher1 Jan 20 '12 at 17:06
    
@jpaleck: No hints??? –  kingsmasher1 Jan 20 '12 at 17:12
    
@kingsmasher1: A member function isn't a function. Think about it. It cannot be invoked without also knowing the object instance on which you want to invoke it. –  Kerrek SB Jan 20 '12 at 17:13
    
@KerrekSB: I got it, but i remember i created a static class (although not much in usage), and i invoked a member function via a destructor without any object or this –  kingsmasher1 Jan 20 '12 at 17:19

1> You can either move the get_digit outside the BinaryCode then your code would work

2> or if you want get_digit to be a non-static member function, then you can use

  class BinaryCode {
    public:
        int get_digit(char c)
        {
                return c-'0';
        }
        void decode(string decd)
        {
            int i;
            std::vector<int>decoded(decd.size());
            std::transform(decd.begin(), decd.end(), decoded.begin(), std::bind1st(std::mem_fun(&BinaryCode::get_digit),this));
        }

};

3>of course if you have access to either boost or c++11, then you can easily use lambda as others have already showed u.

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Quite useful one, especially your 2nd point. But why do we have to bind it using mem_fun? Just binding using bind1st won't serve? –  kingsmasher1 Jan 21 '12 at 5:37

You need to pass a function or functor as the last parameter, not a member function. If you have c++11 enabled, you can use lambda :

std::transform(decd.begin(), decd.end(), decoded.begin(),[this](const char it){ this->get_digit(it) } );

Since you do not have c++11 features, you can convert get_digit, into a function (outside of the class):

int get_digit(char c)
{
  return c-'0';
}
class BinaryCode {
  public:
    void decode(string decd)
    {
      int i;

      std::vector<int>decoded(decd.size());
      std::transform(decd.begin(), decd.end(), decoded.begin(), get_digit);

      int length=decoded.length();
    }
};

or create a functor :

struct get_digit
{
  int operator()(char c) const
  {
      return c-'0';
  }
};

//...
std::transform(decd.begin(), decd.end(), decoded.begin(), get_digit());
//...
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1  
This must be the most awkward and cumbersome way to fake a free function via a member function... –  Kerrek SB Jan 20 '12 at 17:08
    
My compiler does not accept this lambda form: prog1.c: In member function void BinaryCode::decode(std::string)': prog1.c:21: error: expected primary-expression before '[' token prog1.c:21: error: expected primary-expression before "const" ` –  kingsmasher1 Jan 20 '12 at 17:11
    
@KerrekSB I assumed that he used a member function, because he needs access to some member variables. –  BЈовић Jan 20 '12 at 17:17

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