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I want SuperClass12 to inherit from SuperClass1 and SuperClass2:

def getClass1(): 
    class MyMetaClass1(type):
        def __new__(cls, name, bases, dct):
            print dct.get("Attr","")+"Meta1"
            return super(MyMetaClass1, cls).__new__(cls, name, bases, dct)
    return MyMetaClass1

def getClass2(): 
    class MyMetaClass2(type):
        def __new__(cls, name, bases, dct):
            print dct.get("Attr","")+"Meta2"
            return super(MyMetaClass2, cls).__new__(cls, name, bases, dct)
    return MyMetaClass2    

class SuperClass1():
    __metaclass__ = getClass1()
    def fun1(self):
        pass

class SuperClass2():
    __metaclass__ = getClass2()
    def fun2(self):
        pass

class MyClass1(SuperClass1):
    Attr = "MC1"

class MyClass2(SuperClass2):
    Attr = "MC2"

def getClass12(): 
    class myMultiMeta(getClass1(),getClass2()):
        pass
    return myMultiMeta

class SuperClass12(SuperClass1,SuperClass2):
#class SuperClass12(): gives no errors in class construction but then 
#fun1() and fun2() are not members of SuperClass12. 
    __metaclass__ = getClass12()

class MyClass12(SuperClass12):
    Attr = "MC12"

Instance = MyClass12()
Instance.fun1()
Instance.fun2()

sadly I've got this error:

TypeError: Error when calling the metaclass bases metaclass conflict: the metaclass of a derived class must be a (non-strict) subclass of the metaclasses of all its bases

but I cannot understand why, since the metaclass myMultiMeta of my derived class SuperClass12 indeed is a subclass of bothe the metaclasses (MyMetaClass1,MyMetaClass2) of all its bases (SuperClass1,SUperClass2).

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Remember that getClass1 and getClass2 return a new instance of the metaclass. Thus when you set __metaclass__ = getClass1(), that is a different metaclass than the one inherited by myMultiMeta.

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Yes, but then the "metaclass factory" is a bad solution for multi-inheritance. What is "metaclass factory" good for? –  jimifiki Jan 20 '12 at 18:18
    
It's good for lots of things, but stacking factories cannot be done in the way you're doing it due to the issues already discussed. The better option would be to turn this into a class decorator that could grab the current metaclasses, and create a new metaclass inheriting from them and then set this new metaclass on the class you're decorating. –  Michael Merickel Jan 20 '12 at 19:27

As noted by Michael Merickel, the getClass() functions need to return the same object on each call for your inheritance to work. A class that is merely identical isn't good enough. Here's one way to do that, abusing a class to make it act like your getClass() functions. Since the class definition is only executed once, MyMetaClass1 is always the same object when returned.

class getClass1(object):
    class MyMetaClass1(type):
        def __new__(cls, name, bases, dct):
            print dct.get("Attr","")+"Meta1"
            return super(MyMetaClass1, cls).__new__(cls, name, bases, dct)
    class __metaclass__(type):
        def __call__(cls):
            return cls.MyMetaClass1

You could also do it like so, using a real function and abusing a mutable default argument to cache the class instance:

def getClass1(cls=[]):
    if not cls:
        class MyMetaClass1(type):
            def __new__(cls, name, bases, dct):
                print dct.get("Attr","")+"Meta1"
                return super(MyMetaClass1, cls).__new__(cls, name, bases, dct)
        cls.append(MyMetaClass1)
    return cls[0]

You will notice a recurring theme here: abuse of Python features. :-) That is usually a sign that you are doing something that maybe is done better some other way. For example, why are you using factories, rather than just defining the class the normal way? I've seen class factories have some use, but I don't think I've ever seen a metaclass factory in the wild.

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Is this what you want?

class MyMetaClass1(type):
    def __new__(cls, name, bases, dct):
        print dct.get("Attr","")+"Meta1"
        return super(MyMetaClass1, cls).__new__(cls, name, bases, dct)

class MyMetaClass2(type):
    def __new__(cls, name, bases, dct):
        print dct.get("Attr","")+"Meta2"
        return super(MyMetaClass2, cls).__new__(cls, name, bases, dct)

class SuperClass1():
    __metaclass__ = MyMetaClass1
    def fun1(self):
        pass

class SuperClass2():
    __metaclass__ = MyMetaClass2
    def fun2(self):
        pass

class MyClass1(SuperClass1):
    Attr = "MC1"

class MyClass2(SuperClass2):
    Attr = "MC2"

class MyMultiMeta(MyMetaClass1, MyMetaClass2):
    pass

class SuperClass12(SuperClass1, SuperClass2):
#class SuperClass12(): gives no errors in class construction but then 
#fun1() and fun2() are not members of SuperClass12. 
    __metaclass__ = MyMultiMeta

class MyClass12(SuperClass12):
    Attr = "MC12"

Instance = MyClass12()
Instance.fun1()
Instance.fun2()

Run:

vic@ubuntu:~/Desktop$ python test.py 
Meta1
Meta2
MC1Meta1
MC2Meta2
Meta1
Meta2
MC12Meta1
MC12Meta2
vic@ubuntu:~/Desktop$ 
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this is the desired output, now I'm wondering why some people define functions which return the metaclasses, as I tried to do with getClass1(), getClass2() and getClass12()? What was wrong with my code? –  jimifiki Jan 20 '12 at 17:56
    
@jimifiki, frankly - i have no idea :). i just tried to clear your code of those functions. –  warvariuc Jan 20 '12 at 17:59

I thank who, by giving some answers, helped me:

def getClass12(): 
     class myMultiMeta(SuperClass1.__metaclass__,SuperClass2.__metaclass__):
         pass
     return myMultiMeta
 class SuperClass12(SuperClass1,SuperClass2):
     __metaclass__ = getClass12()

is a not so bad solution!

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