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On a micro-controller program I have a few instructions that I would like to execute for every case in a switch except the default. I do not, however, want to write a function call or use a macro for every case.

Because this is for a micro-controller running at 3-7Mhz, speed and code space are important. For example:

switch(letter)
{
case a:
    ShowApple();
    printf("You entered an english letter.");
    break;
case b:
    ShowBananna();
    printf("You entered an english letter.");
    break;
...
case z:
    ShowZebra();
    printf("You entered an english letter.");
    break;
default:
    printf("You did not enter an english letter. Silly human!");
    break;
}
share|improve this question
    
@Wooble: What about all the "ShowApple", "ShowBananna", function calls? Can't fall through to those. –  Billy ONeal Jan 20 '12 at 17:39
    
If this wasn't for a micro-controller... :) –  user166390 Jan 20 '12 at 17:59
    
yes, @BillyONeal it was meant as a placeholder for more code. As was the printf. –  Jeremy Jan 20 '12 at 18:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted
int was_default_picked;

was_default_picked = 0;
switch (letter)
{
// ...

default:
    was_default_picked = 1;
}

if (!was_default_picked)
{
    // Your logic goes here
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 -- but -- yuck. I think I'd rather see "goto" –  Billy ONeal Jan 20 '12 at 17:38
    
Ya that was my first guess. I was hoping there was a more "elegant"way. –  Jeremy Jan 20 '12 at 17:45
2  
To be honest, I don't think this solution is inelegant. Depending on how many cases there are, it may be preferable solely because there is no repeated code--if you add a new case, you cannot forget to update the !default logic. –  James McNellis Jan 20 '12 at 17:47
    
ok, this confirms my suspicion about whether that is the only/best way to do this. thank you. –  Jeremy Jan 20 '12 at 17:57
    
@JamesMcNellis: I just have this extreme hatred for flags :) –  Billy ONeal Jan 20 '12 at 21:35

I'm going to go to hell for this...

switch (foo) {
default:
    /* code for default case */
    break;
    if (0) { case 'a':
        /* ... */
    } if (0) { case 'b':
        /* ... */
    } if (0) { case 'c':
        /* ... */
    }
    /* common code for non-default cases */
}
share|improve this answer
    
I wanted to write lol but i needed to write 16 characters –  Jeremy Jan 20 '12 at 17:59
2  
Ha! I likes it. –  James McNellis Jan 20 '12 at 17:59
    
My inner maintenance programmer just got a migraine... –  bta Jan 20 '12 at 21:03
    
Why does my monstrosity have more upvotes than the accepted answer? I don't know whether to be :-) or :-( ... –  R.. Jan 21 '12 at 0:08

Why don't you use an array of function pointers indexed by a letter instead of switch? That would be both more space and speed efficient. And, IMO, more readable.

static void (*fn_table['z' - 'a' + 1])(void) = {
    &ShowApple,
    &ShowBananna,

    ...,

    &ShowZebra,
};

if (letter < 'a' || 'z' < letter)
{
    printf("You did not enter an english letter. Silly human!");
}
else
{
    (*fn_table[letter - 'a'])();
    printf("You entered an english letter.");
}
share|improve this answer
    
That is a very interesting way of doing it. Though I think the complexity of the method over-complicates the solution. Also that only works if you know that the cases call in successive order. In my 'actual' program, they do not. –  Jeremy Jan 20 '12 at 19:00
    
You also need 'a' to 'z' to be consecutive values in your character set. This is true for ASCII but not for all character sets (EBCDIC comes to mind). –  ouah Jan 20 '12 at 19:25
2  
Supporting non-ASCII-superset character encodings is really a waste of time and brain power. This is 2012 not 1980. We have the interwebs and computers talk together. EBCDIC is not viable except isolated in ancient crap that can't be replaced, and with sanitizing layers separating it from and interfacing it with the real world... :-) –  R.. Jan 21 '12 at 0:04
    
@Jeremy, yes, the solution is viable for not-very-sparse arrays with only a few letters omitted, ideally all cases in successive order. –  Eldar Abusalimov Jan 21 '12 at 6:13

If it's really the last statement in each case, you could simply execute it afterward using an if statement:

int wasEnglish = 1;
switch(letter)
{
case a:
    ShowApple();
    break;
case b:
    ShowBananna();
    break;
...
case z:
    ShowZebra();
    break;
default:
    wasEnglish = 0;
    break;
}

if (wasEnglish)
{
    printf("You entered an english letter.");
}
else
{
    printf("You did not enter an english letter. Silly human!");
}
share|improve this answer

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