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I have the following HTML code with CSS:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" 
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
    <head>
        <style type="text/css">
        div.scroll
        {
            background-color:#00FFFF;
            position:absolute;
            top:0%;
            left:0%;
            width:10%;
            height:100%;
        }

        div.hidden 
        {
            background-color:#00FF00;
            position:absolute;
            top:0%;
            left:50%;
            width:20%;
            height:100%;
        }

        div.menu
        {
            position:absolute;
            top:70%;
            left:20%;
            width:80%;
        }
    </style>
</head>

<body>
    <p>The overflow property specifies what to do if the content of an element exceeds the size of the element's box.</p>

    <div class="menu">
        <div class="scroll">Scroll: You can use the overflow property when you want to have better control of the layout. The default value is visible.</div>
        <div class="hidden">Hidden: You can use the overflow property when you want to have better control of the layout. The default value is visible.</div>
    </div>
</body>

As you can see I want two of the divisions to have color - they don't and I can't figure out why. The file has an html extension and I have used both IE7 and FF 3.0.3 to test.

What perplexes me the most is that it is almost a verbatim copy of an example from W3C schools that does show color! Link to example: W3C example.

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1  
It is not surprising that something you found on W3Schools did not work as you hoped. See w3fools.com –  Phrogz Jan 20 '12 at 18:53
    
Had no idea - made me laugh though :) –  BigMac66 Jan 20 '12 at 19:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is height:100%; . It means that the element use all the height of its parent, in this case the <div class="menu">, which is 0px because all its content is positioned with absolute.

You can either remove it if you want each div of have the size of its text, or set a height in pixel if you want to apply the same height to the both divs.

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This is the correct answer. You can see the effect of height:100% if you additionally set overflow:hidden, demonstrating that the element has zero height, so that all content overflows and is thus shown (if it is shown) outside the element’s area. –  Jukka K. Korpela Jan 20 '12 at 19:06
    
I selected this answer because it more fully explained what was going on which allowed me to make a different change to achieve my desired results. Specifically I did not remove the height attribute from scroll or hidden but added a height:30% to the menu attribute. Once the menu div had height everything behaved the way I wanted. Thanks. –  BigMac66 Jan 20 '12 at 19:26

Remove height: 100%; from your div.scroll and div.hidden CSS classes.

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