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The data in Resource are read from a fistream using read and since read takes a char array I store it in a vector.. When I load the data onto the GPU I would only need the char pointer to the data.. but eg. if I need to calculate the boundingbox of the vertex buffer I would need to have the data as a float.. is this an ok way to do it? Should I return the reference to the vector in GetDataChar() instead?

class Resource
{
protected:
    const std::vector<char>& GetDataRef() const
    {
        return m_data;
    }
private:
    std::vector<char> m_data;
}

class VertexBuffer : public Resource
{
public:
    const char* GetDataChar() const
    {
        return &GetDataRef()[0];
    }

    const float* GetDataFloat() const
    {
        return reinterpret_cast<float*>(&GetDataRef()[0]);
    }
}

class IndexBuffer : public Resource
{
public:
    const char* GetDataChar() const
    {
        return &GetDataRef()[0];
    }

    const int* GetDataInt() const
    {
        return reinterpret_cast<int*>(&GetDataRef()[0]);
    }
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The C++ standard doesn't really say anything about this: externalizing objects, even of built-in types, and reading them back may work or may not work. In practise it tends to work about it generally a bad idea: what starts out a quick way of doing things often quickly becomes used in many places (after all it "works") and effectively restricts usage of the approach to one platform. I have worked on more than project where there is a strong dependency on 32 bit words with a certain Endianess. The fact that contemporary system tend to 64 bit words and popular (and thus cheap and powerful) CPUs a different Endianess effectively means that these projects are restricted to relatively expensive machines which are on top of it abused to run in 32 bit compatibility mode.

That said, it works in practise despite the standard note really making any guarantees. However, the approach you have chosen is bound not to work too well: there are effectively no alignment constraints on char, i.e. the std::vector<char> may allocate memory and happy put e.g. a 32 bit word in front of it, if nothing else for its own entertainment. This would mean that the words you want to load are not properly aligned and either won't be loaded at all or would be loaded in slow-motion. That is, you want your std::vector<T> hold objects with the maximum alignment requirement (e.g. some 16 byte word to cope with 128 bit words) and cast the address to this type to char. This, of course, still means that the data needs to be dumped in exactly the same format as is used on the machine. If possible I would try to avoid this approach.

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Hmm.. I've read your answer a couple of times, but I dont get it :p When I read the data I use: m_data.resize(filesize); filestream.read(&m_data[0], fileSize); I've seen this done in quiet a few places.. –  bitgregor Jan 20 '12 at 21:06
    
could you write some code as an example? –  bitgregor Jan 20 '12 at 21:10
    
The short version: don't use unformatted binary I/O if you can do it differently. If you unformatted binary I/O is your only options, make sure your objects are properly aligned: the array of chars in a std::vector<char> is bound not to be properly aligned. If I talk in terms you don't understand I strongly recommend you don't use unformatted binary I/O! It is quite possible that you didn't want this answer but saying "it works" (which seems to be the answer you want to get) would be wrong. If you clarify which part you don't get I'd be happy to explain. –  Dietmar Kühl Jan 20 '12 at 21:13
    
Code for what? For binary formatting of floating point values? Not easily. This non-trivial to do correct and fast in general. Depending on the data to be formatted it may be unnecessary to format floating point values, however. For example, I have written code for encoding and decoding of decimal values (e.g. using FAST encoding). It is simpler than writing floating point values but still non-trivial. –  Dietmar Kühl Jan 20 '12 at 21:22
    
"externalizing objects, even of built-in types, and reading them back may work or may not work." what do you mean by externalizing objects and reading them back? –  bitgregor Jan 20 '12 at 21:45

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