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I have been looking for a way to list file that do not exist from a list of files that are required to exist. The files can exist in more than one location. What I have now:

#!/bin/bash
fileslist="$1"
while read fn
do
  if [ ! -f `find . -type f -name $fn ` ];
  then
   echo $fn
  fi
done < $fileslist

If a file does not exist the find command will not print anything and the test does not work. Removing the not and creating an if then else condition does not resolve the problem.

How can i print the filenames that are not found from a list of file names?

New script:

#!/bin/bash
fileslist="$1"
foundfiles="~/tmp/tmp`date +%Y%m%d%H%M%S`.txt"
touch $foundfiles
while read fn
do
  `find . -type f -name $fn | sed 's:./.*/::' >> $foundfiles`
done < $fileslist
cat $fileslist $foundfiles | sort | uniq -u
rm $foundfiles
share|improve this question
    
Find what you can and diff with the list you expect? –  cdeszaq Jan 20 '12 at 21:38
    
@cdeszaq, the first thing I thought of, but couldn't come up with the way of doing it without temporary files or sheer bashisms :) –  Michael Krelin - hacker Jan 20 '12 at 21:40
    
Currently I create a list of what i can find and diff that with the fileslist. I thought that I might be able to automate this some to create a list of files that I have to work on. –  user1161495 Jan 20 '12 at 22:18
    
maybe find is not the right tool. Is there some alternative that I have not thought of? –  user1161495 Jan 20 '12 at 22:31
    
I tested my original script on fedora 16 at home and it appears to work how I wanted it to. I was working on RHEL 5.7 at work. This makes me think that some of the answers that were posted that didn't work for me may be valid for others. –  user1161495 Jan 21 '12 at 18:12

6 Answers 6

#!/bin/bash
fileslist="$1"
while read fn
do
  FPATH=`find . -type f -name $fn`
  if [ "$FPATH." = "." ]
  then
   echo $fn
  fi
done < $fileslist

You were close!

share|improve this answer
    
This raises the question of what find returns when it doesn't find a match. How can I evaluate the result? –  user1161495 Jan 20 '12 at 22:27
    
The exit code from find will be false when it fails. So you could simply find . -name "$fn" >/dev/null || echo Not there: "$fn" –  tripleee Jan 21 '12 at 8:42

Here is test.bash:

#!/bin/bash

fn=test.bash

exists=`find . -type f -name $fn`
if [ -n "$exists" ]
then
  echo Found it
fi

It sets $exists = to the result of the find. the if -n checks if the result is not null.

share|improve this answer
    
If $exists is null, then you'll get a syntax error on the 'if' statement. –  schtever Jan 20 '12 at 21:42
    
I tested this code with a file that existed, and one that didn't. It worked fine. –  Almo Jan 20 '12 at 21:55
    
Neither -z nor ! -n work with the result of find when it does not match a file name. –  user1161495 Jan 20 '12 at 22:13
    
Sorry, I had it backward. Edited. –  Almo Jan 20 '12 at 22:21

Try replacing body with [[ -z "$(find . -type f -name $fn)" ]] && echo $fn. (note that this code is bound to have problems with filenames containing spaces).

More efficient bashism:

diff <(sort $fileslist|uniq) <(find . -type f -printf %f\\n|sort|uniq)

I think you can handle diff output.

share|improve this answer
    
Neither -z nor ! -n work with the result of find when it does not match a file name. –  user1161495 Jan 20 '12 at 22:04
    
Works for me $ [[ -z "$(find /tmp -name nosuchfile)" ]] && echo no such thing in there no such thing in there –  Michael Krelin - hacker Jan 20 '12 at 23:22
    
I've added more efficient diffing. Since you're diffing now, I think you can properly tweak diff options and know what to do with the output –  Michael Krelin - hacker Jan 20 '12 at 23:35

Give this a try:

find -type f -print0 | grep -Fzxvf - requiredfiles.txt

The -print0 and -z protect against filenames which contain newlines. If your utilities don't have these options and your filenames don't contain newlines, you should be OK.

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The repeated find to filter one file at a time is very expensive. If your file list is directly compatible with the output from find, run a single find and remove any matches from your list:

find . -type f |
fgrep -vxf - "$1"

If not, maybe you can massage the output from find in the pipeline before the fgrep so that it matches the format in your file; or, conversely, massage the data in your file into find-compatible.

share|improve this answer
    
I am looking for 20 or 100 files but the directory structure that I am looking in has almost 1500 files. I don't think this will work. –  user1161495 Jan 20 '12 at 22:29

I use this script and it works for me

#!/bin/bash
fileslist="$1"
found="Found:"
notfound="Not found:"
len=`cat $1 | wc -l`
n=0;

while read fn
do
  # don't worry about this, i use it to display the file list progress
  n=$((n + 1))
  echo -en  "\rLooking $(echo "scale=0; $n * 100 / $len" | bc)% "
  if [ $(find / -name $fn | wc -l) -gt 0 ]
  then
    found=$(printf "$found\n\t$fn")
  else
    notfound=$(printf "$notfound\n\t$fn")
  fi
done < $fileslist

printf "\n$found\n$notfound\n"

The line counts the number of lines and if its greater than 0 the find was a success. This searches everything on the hdd. You could replace / with . for just the current directory.

$(find / -name $fn | wc -l) -gt 0

Then i simply run it with the files in the files list being separated by newline

./search.sh files.list 
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