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Essentially, I would like to create a database structure that allows for classifying an infinite amount of inventory items in an infinite amount of ways, however, many of these items share certain "traits". Take, for instance, Cars and Trucks:

  • Both can be red or blue only.
    • Either color car/truck can be 2wd or 4wd.
      • Cars can have manual or automatic transmission.
      • Trucks can have cloth or leather seats
      • etc....

The thing I am looking to avoid would be manual entry of every possible combination that exists. With 5 colors and 5 vehicles, that's already 25 entries and no feature set classifications.

Is there a data model that allows for these relationships and shared "groups of traits", or more importantly, one that allows for a single reference to each possible combination of any set of data I can imagine? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Updated [2012-01-23]

Let me be as specific as possible. My main goal is to track material usage on jobs we are doing for budgetary and historical purposes. Some materials, i.e. studs and track, will share the same sub-classifications, with track having yet a 3rd sub-classification. Some will have completely different sub-classifications. Assume the following.

  • 5 possible metal_widths
  • 5 possible metal_gagues
  • 4 possible track_types
  • 5 possible insulation_widths
  • 3 possible insulation_types

...the relationships (possible combinations):

  • Studs > metal_widths > metal_gagues (25)
  • Track > metal_widths > metal_gagues > track_types (100)
  • Insulation > insulation_widths > insulation_types (15)

Just to get an idea of my ultimate goal, the application workflow would be something like this:

  1. Create a job.
  2. Create a job budget.
    • Set a budget amount/cost for each material I expect to use.
  3. Begin entering material invoices.
    • Set an amount/cost for each material on the invoice.
  4. Track/Review my budget estimates vs. actual cost.

I think the goal of my budget vs cost application is pretty straight forward, I just want to get the design of the material-related database correct before moving forward. I realize the easiest solution would be to create a single entry for each possible combination in a material table and limit that database to n number of possible traits. The problem is that when I decide to add an x width stud, I also want to add an x width track, meaning I've increased the possible combinations by 30, and therefore require 30 additional entries (which I'd really rather avoid).

My question remains the same: Is there a data model that allows for these relationships and, more importantly, is there one that allows single reference points for each possibility... or, should I scratch this notion and go with single entries for each material and limit the number of traits.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+100

You mean something like this?

enter image description here

This simple model allows you to group the traits together and then "apply" the whole trait group to an arbitrary number of items (the ITEM_TRAIT_GROUP table is a typical example of how an M:N relationship can be represented in relational paradigm). If your primary concern is to avoid repetition through "reuse" of traits this model might fit the bill.

This, however, will not enforce:

  1. any particular trait group onto a specific item kind (such as cars requiring a color) nor any particular relationship between traits (such as seat material having to go together with the seat color),
  2. nor will it limit values for any particular trait (such as color having to be "red" or "blue" but not, for example, "green").

(1) and (2) would demand some sort of type system and even "inheritance" (in OOP sense), which is no fun in relational paradigm. If you really need it, you are probably better-off enforcing this kind of logic at the client or middle tier.

The (3) can be reasonably modeled relationally, but not without complicating the model, which may or may not be worth the effort.

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This is kind of what I was thinking, where most of my relationship logic would have to be done client-side (I was just looking for a DB design that did most of the lifting). I was thinking I could do something like material_groups and have each group allow for up to three (3) trait_groups. That way, if I am entering an invoice item I could validate through the group whether or not the assigned traits for that item were valid for the material I am entering. This is basically the way I was heading (a mix of design/client-side logic) and wanted to ask if you thought it would work. –  bschaeffer Jan 30 '12 at 17:27

I'm not sure i understand what you mean by "therefore require 30 additional entries". You don't have to enter all combinations explicitly unless they actually carry information. For instance, if you had a supplier's price list with all prices then you'd have 30 additional rows with a new price each. But that doesn't seem to be what you want. You seem to want an entry for the budgeted and later invoiced price of all the items that make up a job.

Let's try to tackle the problem in a straightforward way:

METAL_WIDTH
id | unit | amount | displaytext
 1 |  mm  |   10   |  2/5 in
 2 |  mm  |   15   |  3/5 in
 3 |  mm  |   20   |  4/5 in
 4 |  mm  |   25   |  1 in
 5 |  mm  |   30   |  1 1/5 in

METAL_GAUGE...
TRACK_TYPE...
INSULATION_WIDTH...
INSULATION_TYPE...

i skipped the details of the four other tables, their structure is analoguous to METAL_WIDTH

JOB
id | name
 1 | test job


BUDGET_ITEM
id | job_id | type | metal_width_id | metal_gauge_id | track_type_id | insulation_width_id | insulation_type_id | price_in_dollar
1  |    1   | STUD |       1        |      1         |    null       |      null           |     null           |    50

INVOICE_ITEM
id | job_id | type | metal_width_id | metal_gauge_id | track_type_id | insulation_width_id | insulation_type_id | price_in_dollar
1  |    1   | STUD |       1        |      1         |    null       |      null           |     null           |    49.95

Here i made INVOICE_ITEM and BUDGET_ITEM separate tables because i feel you'll probably want to use INVOICE_ITEM for more than just budget control. But you could throw all items into one big JOB_ITEMS table. The opposite is also possible: you could create a STUD_PRICE table, and a TRACK_PRICE, and a INSULATION_PRICE. More tables mean queries become longer, but now you can store the information that STUDs can only have METAL_GAUGE and METAL_WIDTH properties:

STUD_PRICE
id | job_id | purpose | metal_width_id | metal_gauge_id | price
 1 |    1   | BUDGET  |       1        |       1        |  50
 2 |    1   | INVOICE |       1        |       1        |  49.95

And now you'll probably notice that you have a redundancy: the same stud is entered twice, which will become a problem if you'd like to compare budget and invoice, and have more than one stud in a job:

STUD_PRICE
id | job_id | purpose | metal_width_id | metal_gauge_id | price
 1 |    1   | BUDGET  |       1        |       1        |  50
 2 |    1   | INVOICE |       1        |       1        |  49.95
 3 |    1   | BUDGET  |       1        |       2        |  75
 4 |    1   | INVOICE |       1        |       2        |  89.95

which INVOICE belongs to which BUDGET now? You're one typo away from an interesting problem. So you're probably better off with:

STUD_ITEM
id | job_id | metal_width_id | metal_gauge_id | budget_price | invoice_price
 1 |    1   |       1        |       1        |  50          |   49.95
 2 |    1   |       1        |       2        |  75          |   null

where null means "not invoiced yet", and once you're there, you can take the BUGET_ITEM and INVOICE_ITEM tables from above and combine them to a JOB_ITEM

JOB_ITEM
id | job_id | type | metal_width_id | metal_gauge_id | track_type_id | insulation_width_id | insulation_type_id | budget_price | invoice_price
1  |    1   | STUD |       1        |      1         |    null       |      null           |     null           |    50        | 49.95

Your application would allow you to create a new job, set its attributes, and then add items to its budget. You could say "New item..." and have the choice between STUDs, TRACKs and INSULATIONs. Once you choose STUD, you get a menu with the allowed METAL_WIDTHs, another with the allowed METAL_GAUGEs. You choose them, set a budget price and store the item. Repeat as necessary. Once you get to the invoice stage, you select the stored item and set the invoice price. Budget/invoice comparison is done by going over all items in a job, adding all budget prices for a projected total budget, and adding all invoices for the actual total invoiced amount, with bonus points for also showing the budgeted cost for only those items where invoice_price is not null.

To create text for the invoice, you just have to concatenate the contents of the displaytext columns, thus saving the need for a row for each of "Stud - 2/5 in - 10ga" through "Stud - 1 1/5 in - 18ga". If you now add a METAL_WIDTH, all you have to do is add one row to the METAL_WIDTH table, and you're good.

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Make an automobile class. An Automobile can be either truck, or car. Maybe you should look into inheritance and abstraction - two foundations of object oriented design.

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I mean, yeah, but what would that class do? SELECT what? FROM where? WHERE wtf = ?. My problem is that I have no DB design experience and I don't know if what I am looking for is even possible or necessary. –  bschaeffer Jan 20 '12 at 22:00
    
That class would hold the general specifics of an automobile. Color, curb weight, price, dimensions. At which, the car class could inherit those classifications, and have a set of its own. Maybe some static such as two axles, four tires, and then some dynamic such as number of doors, number of seats, etc etc. –  Travis J Jan 20 '12 at 22:16

I'm not sure what you mean by "single reference points for each possibility".

You could simply enter your data into a wide, varchar() column, as

  • Stud, 8 mm, 8 ga
  • Stud, 10 mm, 8 ga
  • Stud, 12 mm, 6 ga
  • Track, 8mm, 8 ga type 1
  • Track, 10 mm, 8 ga type 2

This doesn't require you to enter anything ahead of time, and it offers the greatest flexibility, although that flexibility comes at the cost of data integrity. (Or increased administrative overhead from constantly watching the entries for mistakes.) It can also complicate reports. For example, reporting only 8 gauge studs is more complex.

Off-the-shelf accounting systems--which are already programmed to deal with budgets, estimates, and invoices--will usually require you to store inventory in just this way.

Assuming that you've already made the conscious, informed decision not to use your accounting system for this, that you're simply not going to store values this way, and instead want the greater data integrity that comes with foreign key constraints, it might make sense to generate the sets automatically.

-- This table will be used as a foreign key reference for tracks. 
-- Adjust the CHECK() constraints for your actual values. If you're using MySQL,
-- replace the CHECK() constraints with foreign key references to separate tables.
--
create table studs (
  metal_width_mm integer not null check (metal_width_mm between 5 and 10),
  metal_gauge integer not null check (metal_gauge between 8 and 16),
  primary key (metal_width, metal_gauge)
);

To populate it, put the known values into common table expressions, and generate a Cartesian product.

insert into studs
with gauge as (
  select 8 as metal_gauge
  union all
  select 10
  union all
  select 12
  union all
  select 14
  union all
  select 16
),
width as (
  select 5 as metal_width_mm
  union all
  select 6
  union all
  select 7
  union all
  select 8
  union all
  select 9
  union all
  select 10
)
select * 
from width, gauge

If you have to add values often, it's not hard to write a SQL stored procedure to insert only the new combinations.

If you're not looking for either this much flexibility or this much data integrity, consider clarifying your question.

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By single reference point, i just meant something like a Track - 3 5/8 18ga could be referenced as material_id = 6 in an invoice_item table... something like that. –  bschaeffer Jan 24 '12 at 17:51
    
@bschaeffer: You can do that with either of the two ways I posted. But dangers lurk. You have to be careful about allowing updates. Updating 'Track - 3 5/8 18ga' to 'Track - 3 5/8 16ga' could corrupt a lot of data. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Jan 24 '12 at 18:53

When I worked at Onan and they had to track valid configurations of generator sets, they used two tables, 'must use' and 'not allowed.'

So, given your example:

cars and trucks,
    Both can be red or blue only.
    Either color car/truck can be 2wd or 4wd.
        Cars can have manual or automatic transmission.
        Trucks can have cloth or leather seats

in the 'must use' table, there would be rules like

object | attribute | mustUse1 | orMustUse2

car | color | red | blue
truck | color | red | blue
car | wd | 2wd | 4wd
truck | wd | 2wd | 4wd
car | transmission | manual | automatic
truck | seats | cloth | leather

In your case, if you have a lot of duplicates, you could probably store a higher-level relationship, like cars and trucks are autos, and then in the 'must use' table, just have

auto | color | red | blue
auto | wd | 2wd | 4wd
car | transmission | manual | automatic
truck | seats | cloth | leather

Also, I'm not sure why the possible combinations are hanging you up. Given

    5 possible metal_widths
    5 possible metal_gagues
    4 possible track_types
    5 possible insulation_widths
    3 possible insulation_types

...the relationships (possible combinations):

    Studs > metal_widths > metal_gagues (25)
    Track > metal_widths > metal_gagues > track_types (100)
    Insulation > insulation_widths > insulation_types (15)

Have a table for metal_widths with 5 rows, metal_gauges with 5 rows, studs with a metal_widthID and metal_gaugeID, track with a (studID?) and track_typeID, and insulation with insulation_widthID and insulation_typeID.

If you don't feel like your experience is adequate to model and then apply the data, you could have someone else do it.

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is RDBMS a requirement? Could you use a graphDB like Neo4j instead?

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I'd approach it by modeling items (and quotes) as objects with a type, and specifying traits using key-value pairs. Showing tables in what follows by example, and ignoring things like primary keys:

First have a table of all valid key-value pairs:

VALID_KEY_VALUES
| key             | value   |
=============================
| metal_width     | mwidth1 |
| metal_width     | mwidth2 |
...
| insulation_type | itype3  |

This addresses your requirement, if you need to add a new metal_width, then it's one insert into this table. (Currently 22 rows in your example).

Now have a table of valid keys for each type:

VALID_TYPE_KEYS
| type       | key              |
=================================
| stud       | metal_width      |
| stud       | metal_gauge      |
| track      | metal_width      |
| track      | metal_gauge      |
| track      | track_type       |
| insulation | insulation_width |
| insulation | insulation_type  |

Now an item (or a quote) is defined by two tables, first, the items by ID:

ITEMS
| ID | type | .... whatever columns you need ...
================================================
| 1  | stud | ..................................

And now the "traits" of that item:

ITEM_TRAITS
| itemID | type | key         | value   |
=========================================
| 1      | stud | metal_width | mwidth1 |
| 1      | stud | metal_gauge | mgauge2 |

(This is a bit denormalized, because each row contains the itemID and the type from the ITEMS table, but we can live with that for the moment). In other words, item 1 is a stud with metal_width=mwidth1, metal_gauge=mgauge2.

You can stick it all together by using multiple-column foreign keys from the ITEM_TRAITS table.

(itemID, type) is a foreign key into the ITEMS table
(type, key) is a foreign key to the VALID_TYPE_KEYS table
(key, value) is a foreign key to the VALID_KEY_VALUES table

This looks like a good start on what you need. If you need to add a new type, a new trait, or a new value of the trait, it's done with the minimum inserts. Your quotes can be done similarly, with QUOTES and QUOTE_TRAITS tables. You can match items with quotes by joins, counting how many traits match between item and quote (and comparing that with the total number of traits for a given type).

You may need to do some work on the client, iterating over all keys for a given type, to make sure all the necessary data gets entered, and this does assume that every one of your "combinations" is valid. (If you do have a situation where some combinations are valid and some are not, then you won't be able to avoid enumerating them all). This also assumes there's no "drilldown" logic either, that specifying one trait doesn't restrict the values of any later ones, but you may even be able to extend this idea to that case as well (provided your requirements aren't too insane).

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