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When creating an object(or anything) in java, what is the difference between doing, for example,

Dog d = new Dog();

instead of doing

Dog d;

and then later, finishing it off(sometimes inside and at the beginning of a method) with

d = new Dog();

Wouldn't the first one be more simple and easier? Why do people do it the second way?

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11 Answers 11

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Think of the following scenario. Assume the constructor of Dog can throw an exception:

try {
    Dog d = new Dog();    
} catch(Exception ex) {
    // treat exception
}

d.bark();

This won't compile because d is not visible outside the try block. What you need to do is this:

Dog d = null;
try {
    d = new Dog();    
} catch(Exception ex) {
    // treat exception
}
if(d != null) d.bark();

And there are many other situations like this. For example, you might have an if-else block where d is initialized differently based on some condition:

Dog d = null;
if(/* condition */)
    d = new Dog("Lassie");   
} else {
    d = new Dog("Sam");
}
d.bark();
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There is big difference between Dog d = null; and Dog d;. I believe the OP asks about the latter form. –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Jan 20 '12 at 22:18
    
@Tomasz Nurkiewicz: It's never a good idea to declare objects without initializing them anyway. –  Tudor Jan 20 '12 at 22:22
    
@Tudor, sometimes it is a very good idea to declare an object without initializing it. Objects declared final can only be set once, and sometimes it's not known what it needs to be set to at the point it is declared. –  Skip Head Jan 20 '12 at 22:27
    
@TomaszNurkiewicz, what is the difference? I thought Dog d; == null. –  Ash Burlaczenko Jan 20 '12 at 22:31
1  
@LouisWasserman: an uninitialized field defaults to null. An uninitialized local variable has no default value. It must be explicitely initialized before it's used. And that is not compiler-dependant. –  JB Nizet Jan 20 '12 at 22:57

The question lacks some important context. There is a substantial difference if the variable definition and the usage are in separate scopes. For example:

class A { 
  Dog d;

  void foo() { d = new Dog(); }
}

...allows Dog to be accessed by every member of class A.

If the usage is in the same scope,

class A {
  void foo() {
     Dog d;
     d = new Dog();
  }
}

...then it's an issue of readability, as the code will run the same with it in one or two lines.

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Because you don't always know how to construct the object when you declare it. For example:

Dog dog;
if ("M".equals(sex)) {
    dog = new Dog("Medor");
}
else {
    dog = new Dog("Mirza");
}
dog.walk();
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This is one of the place which begs for final Dog dog = Dog.create("M") or at least extra local method. –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Jan 20 '12 at 22:21
1  
@TomaszNurkiewicz - it only begs for that if you have a mindset that says that deferred initialization is intrinsically bad. I (for one) am perfectly happy with writing and reading code that uses this feature appropriately. –  Stephen C Jan 20 '12 at 23:04
    
@StephenC: +1, I wasn't really aware that with deferred initialization you can still use final (final Dog dog;)! –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Jan 21 '12 at 11:24

This is only declaration a reference (you say d will have type Dog):

Dog d;

This is creating a new object, and assigning it to reference variable d:

new Dog();

You can combine it because you often do both, but not always.

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While it is not a good idea to habitually separate the declaration and initialization

  • there are some circumstances where you need to do this (see the try catch example),

  • there are some circumstances where it improves code readability (see the Max Schmidt's example),

  • there are some circumstances where it makes your code more robust.

To illustrate the last point, consider Max Schmidt's example modified:

Dog d = null;
if (input.equals("lab")) {
   d = new Labrador();
} else if (input.equals("bull")) {
   d = new Bulldog();
}
d.walk();

See the bug? If input is neither "lab" or "bull", the code will die when we walk a null dog.

However, if we remove the initialization of d, then the compiler will tell us that there is a path through the code which leaves d uninitialized. If we are paying attention, we see the bug and fix it before the code is run.

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Lots of reasons. One reason might be that the initialization depends on runtime-determined conditions. For instance,

Animal pet;
...
if(input == 0) pet = new Dog();
else pet = new Cat();
...
pet.sleep();
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You example will not compile as pet is not guaranteed to be assigned. –  Steve Kuo Jan 20 '12 at 23:27
    
@Steve Kuo Edited. Does that compile? –  Patrick87 Jan 20 '12 at 23:42
    
Yes, it is now correct. –  Steve Kuo Jan 21 '12 at 0:08

It's a crude example of lazy initialization. In your program, it is possible that you may never need an actual instance of the Dog object. In those cases, you could simply declare the Dog reference, which does not consume much memory and later initialize it when required.

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Also what @Tudor said, very relevant. –  Sid Jan 20 '12 at 22:17

Object Creation and Object Declaration. You can read about it here

When you do Dog d = new Dog();, you are declaring a variable d of type Dog and by using the new operator you are creating the variable.

So you would normally declare the variable that you need at the beginning and create them only when they are really used.

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There is no reason, it is just a poor coding practice. Since you cannot use d before it is initialized, there is no point in declaring it earlier:

Dog d;
//...you cannot use `d` in any way! It won't compile
d = new Dog();
//now you can

This however:

Dog d = null;
//...
d = new Dog();

makes sense as someone might check for null (lazy-initialization, etc.)

For the sake of simplicity you should actually prefer:

final Dog d = new Dog();
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Sometimes there is no other way than the second one, for example if dog is a superclass of Labrador and Bulldog:

Dog d;

if (input == "lab"){
  d = new Labrador();
}else if {
 d = new  Bulldog();
}

d.urinate():
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The second one may be more useful in the cases where you have something like try/catch where Dog will be created, creating dog instance shouldn't stop your other logic in that method. If dog instance is there you want to use after try/catch, otherwise continue your logic.

If you use first syntax inside try/catch, you can't use it outside.

try {
    Dog d = new Dog();    
} catch(Exception ex) {

}

d.methodCall();
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