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Combine multiple results in a subquery into a single comma-separated value
Concat groups in SQL Server

I want to be able to get the duplication's removed

SELECT Count(Data) as Cnt, Id
FROM [db].[dbo].[View_myView]
Group By Data
HAVING Count(Data) > 1

In MySQL it was as simple as this:

SELECT Count(Data), group_concat(Id)
FROM View_myView
Group By Data
Having Cnt > 1

Does anyone know of a solution? Examples are a plus!

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1  
You can't group by something you use in an aggregate function. I think you mean to group by id –  Justin Satyr Jan 20 '12 at 22:15
    
@marc_s Thanks! –  Jason Foglia Jan 20 '12 at 23:52
    
I'm trying to remove dups out of the DB. MSSQL does not make this simple, this is over "searched" and used all the time in DB's task anywhere. There should be a way to prevent dups in the first place, but this was not my DB and app. –  Jason Foglia Jan 20 '12 at 23:55
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marked as duplicate by marc_s, Mikael Eriksson, gbn, Sean Owen, outis Jan 21 '12 at 17:55

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In SQL Server as of version 2005 and newer, you can use a CTE (Common Table Expression) with the ROW_NUMBER function to eliminate duplicates:

;WITH LastPerUser AS
(
   SELECT 
       ID, UserID, ClassID, SchoolID, Created,
       ROW_NUMBER() OVER(PARTITION BY UserID ORDER BY Created DESC) AS 'RowNum'
   FROM dbo.YourTable
)
SELECT 
   ID, UserID, ClassID, SchoolID, Created,
FROM LastPerUser
WHERE RowNum = 1

This CTE "partitions" your data by UserID, and for each partition, the ROW_NUMBER function hands out sequential numbers, starting at 1 and ordered by Created DESC - so the latest row gets RowNum = 1 (for each UserID) which is what I select from the CTE in the SELECT statement after it.

Using the same CTE, you can also easily delete duplicates:

;WITH LastPerUser AS
(
   SELECT 
       ID, UserID, ClassID, SchoolID, Created,
       ROW_NUMBER() OVER(PARTITION BY UserID ORDER BY Created DESC) AS 'RowNum'
   FROM dbo.YourTable
)
DELETE FROM dbo.YourTable t
FROM LastPerUser cte
WHERE t.ID = cte.ID AND cte.RowNum > 1

Same principle applies: you "group" (or partition) your data by some criteria, you consecutively number all the rows for each data partition, and those with values larger than 1 for the "partitioned row number" are weeded out by the DELETE.

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Just use distinct to remove duplicates. It sounds like you were using group_concat to join duplicates without actually wanting to use its value. In that case, MySQL also has a distinct you could have been using:

SELECT DISTINCT Count(Data) as Cnt, Id
FROM [db].[dbo].[View_myView]
GROUP BY Id
HAVING Count(Data) > 1

Also, you can't group by something you use in an aggregate function; I think you mean to group by id. I corrected it in the example above.

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Thank you @Justin Satyr! My intention is to use the Data column to group by. Obviously, MSSQL does not allow you to do that. I'm moving from MySQL to MSSQL. I guess I was spoiled! –  Jason Foglia Jan 20 '12 at 23:58
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