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I'm developing an ajax website and i know that it is a good practice to keep all links as normal links (i.e "cats/") and, if javascript is enabled, ajaxify them ("#cats"). My website is fully crawlable by search engines and all pages are indexed.

My question is : when a user lands on the page "www.example.com/cats" through Google and if his browser is javascript enabled, is it safe to automatically redirect him to "www.example.com/#cats" with a simple javascript redirection (location.href = ...) ?

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If /cats and /#cats don't lead to different content, there's no need to do this. Generally, the hash works with something like /animals#cats where #cats brings the user to the cats section of the /animals page. –  scottm Jan 20 '12 at 22:34
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3 Answers

Don't do this. It results in the HTML of the page being loaded twice! The average user doesn't care about the address bar anyway.

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When your page loads, use javascript to check the url if /cats is present simply run your ajxy functions, there is no need to redirect.

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Do you mean that when a user lands on the page /cats, he must stay here and navigation must be done with ajax from this page ? Does it mean that all my pages have to be based on the same template (with some static differences) ? –  user1161554 Jan 20 '12 at 22:55
    
Url could be polluted : www.example.com/cats/#dogs... So HTML5 pushState is a good solution to make urls simplier and remove the # : www.example.com/cats/#dogs to www.example.com/dogs. But i have to create a real static web page at www.example.com/dogs to welcome users who land on this page (from bookmark, external link...). Am i on the right way ? –  user1161554 Jan 21 '12 at 6:41
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I know that it is a good practice to keep all links as normal links (i.e "cats/")

It is.

if javascript is enabled, ajaxify them ("#cats").

No, using fragment identifiers has serious drawbacks. It is good practise to either leave them as normal links or (if it is going to make a significant improvement to the usability of the site) Ajaxify them using pushState and friends.

Using pushState and friends makes the last paragraph of your question moot — since you only have one URI representing the content instead of two.

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The only benefit to redirect my users is to maintain only one page (the website index) to deliver ajax content. All others pages are just automatically generated static pages. –  user1161554 Jan 20 '12 at 22:50
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