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Disclaimer: I fully understand the risks/downsides of using eval but this is one niche case where I couldn't find any other way.

In Google Apps Scripting, there still is no built-in capability to import a script as a library so many sheets can use the same code; but, there is a facility built-in where I can import text from a plaintext file.

Here's the eval-ing code:

var id = [The-docID-goes-here];
var code = DocsList.getFileById(id).getContentAsString();
var lib = eval(code);
Logger.log(lib.fetchDate());

Here's some example code I'm using in the external file:

{
  fetchDate: function() {
    var d = new Date();
    var dateString = (d.getMonth() + 1) + "/" + d.getDate() + "/" + d.getFullYear();
    return dateString;
  }
}

What I'm aiming for is to drop a big object literal (containing all the library code) onto a local variable so I can reference it's properties/functions like they're contained in their own namespace.

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1  
And the question is? –  Abe Petrillo Jan 20 '12 at 23:42
    
@AbePetrillo Can an object literal be read in and eval'd directly. If so, how? The answer is yes; by wrapping the object in parentheses it can be evaluated as an anonymous function that returns the object literal in a manner that can be assigned to a variable. It's kind of a hackish workaround but I was trying to find a way to import in a Google Apps Script. –  Evan Plaice Nov 30 '12 at 21:01
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Replace var lib = eval(code); with:

var lib = eval('(' + code + ')');

When the parens are omitted, the curly braces are being interpreted as markers of a block of code. As a result, the return value of eval is the fetchData function, instead of a object containing the function.

When the function name is missing, the code inside the block is read as a labelled anonymous function statement, which is not valid.

After adding the parens, the curly braces are used as object literals (as intended), and the return value of eval is an object, with the fetchData method. Then, your code will work.

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1  
Actually without parens the value of eval is an error because fetchData: value is interpreted as a label and an anonymous function expression isn't a valid value for a label. –  Raynos Jan 20 '12 at 23:48
    
No, this works flawlessly. I should have figured that somebody on Stack Overflow would know the nitty gritty details of eval. I was wondering why the hell toString was returning a [function] from the eval. Thanks! –  Evan Plaice Jan 21 '12 at 0:05
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You cannot evaluate

{
  fetchDate: function() {
    var d = new Date();
    var dateString = (d.getMonth() + 1) + "/" + d.getDate() + "/" + d.getFullYear();
    return dateString;
  }
}

Because it is not a valid expression (Object literals on their own are interpreted as blocks. fetch: function () { } is not a valid expression).

Try

var myLibName = {
  fetchDate: function() {
    var d = new Date();
    var dateString = (d.getMonth() + 1) + "/" + d.getDate() + "/" + d.getFullYear();
    return dateString;
  }
};
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Your your solution worked perfectly but I'm trying to make it so the namespace is configurable where eval is being called. Thanks anyway, maybe this will help somebody else. –  Evan Plaice Jan 21 '12 at 0:07
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