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This is the code in my project, I ran it once and it worked but the next time an trying it, it doesn't with the error "Input string was not in a correct format". Need your urgent assistance.

con = new SqlConnection();
con.ConnectionString = ConClass.conString();
string newstud = "SELECT MAX(StudentRegNo) FROM NewStudent";
if (search(newstud) != "")
  RegNo = (int.Parse(search(newstud)) + 1);
else
  RegNo = 1;
lblStuReg.Text = "AP/HQ/" + RegNo.ToString();
share|improve this question
2  
what does the search() method do? –  McBainUK Jan 20 '12 at 23:43
1  
What is the search method? Why don't you instantiate SqlConnection within the search method. You also call search twice. Just could just RegNo = GetNextStudentRegNo(); and that method would do sql query SELECT MAX(StudentRegNo)+1 FROM NewStudent –  Luke Hutton Jan 20 '12 at 23:44
2  
This is almost certainly the wrong way to create a new id number. You're setting up a race condition if two people add students at about the same time. –  Joel Coehoorn Jan 21 '12 at 0:01
    
the lblStuReg display the current available Student Registration Number, so the search() method searches for the current max number already allocated so that the next number can be allocated –  Will Jan 21 '12 at 1:00

4 Answers 4

This particular message is coming from the int.Parse call because the result of search(newStudQuery) is not returning a number value. To protect against this either catch the exception or use TryParse instead

if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(queryResult)) {
  if (int.TryParse(search(newStudQuery), out RegNo) {
    RegNo += 1; }
  } else { 
    // Handle the case where the result is not a number
  }
} else {
  RegNo = 1;
}
share|improve this answer

This error very likely means that search(newstud) did return a string which was not empty but which also could not be parsed as integer.

I assume search is performing a SQL query. You should store the result in a variable otherwise it is calling it twice and use int.TryParse to parse the result (it also makes the code a bit shorter):

string newStudQuery = "SELECT MAX(StudentRegNo) FROM NewStudent";
string queryResult = search(newStudQuery);
if (!int.TryParse(queryResult, out RegNo))
{
    RegNo = 0;
}
RegNo++;    
share|improve this answer
    
@Filburt Yup, fixed the code –  ChrisWue Jan 21 '12 at 0:08
    
@Filburt Grmpf, fixed, thanks :) –  ChrisWue Jan 21 '12 at 0:20

Maybe you could simply query for

string newstud = "SELECT ISNULL(MAX(StudentRegNo) + 1, 1) FROM NewStudent";

... the questions sounds like your creating a id sequence in your application - this should rather be handled by a auto-incrementing your StudentRegNo inside your database.


Just for the sake of excercise - you could shorten things down to

int RegNo; // assuming you also just declared it somewhere above
int.TryParse(search(newStudQuery), out RegNo);
RegNo++;

But as Luke pointed out, search() should also be refactored to return something more usefull instead of a string that could be empty or even a null reference.

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I think you mean SELECT ISNULL(MAX(StudentRegNo) + 1, 1) FROM NewStudent –  ta.speot.is Jan 21 '12 at 0:13
    
If it's SQL Server we're dealing with ... I'll update but the whole thing looks like "don't do this" anyway. –  Filburt Jan 21 '12 at 0:17
    
I think you mean It is SQL Server we're dealing with... con = new SqlConnection(); gives it away. –  ta.speot.is Jan 21 '12 at 0:21
    
But you're right, it's a bad idea. –  ta.speot.is Jan 21 '12 at 0:21

Here:

RegNo = (int.Parse(search(newstud)) + 1);

search(newstud) isn't returning a number.

edit: Use:

con = new SqlConnection();
con.ConnectionString = ConClass.conString();
string newstud = "SELECT MAX(StudentRegNo) FROM NewStudent";
try{
  RegNo = (int.Parse(search(newstud)) + 1);
}
catch{
  RegNo = 1;
}
lblStuReg.Text = "AP/HQ/" + RegNo.ToString();

edit: Actually, you should probably go with Jared's answer.

share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't this be better using TryParse(int) - I would expect it carries the same overhead as the Try{..} Catch{..} - and it's a whole lot cleaner! –  Stuart.Sklinar Mar 31 '12 at 19:11
    
Never mind - just read Jared's answer! –  Stuart.Sklinar Mar 31 '12 at 19:12

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