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I am working on a simple solution to update a user's password in Active Directory.

I can successfully update the users password. Updating the password works fine. Lets say the user has updated the password from MyPass1 to MyPass2

Now when I run my custom code to validate users credential using:

using(PrincipalContext pc = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.Domain, "TheDomain"))
{
    // validate the credentials
    bool isValid = pc.ValidateCredentials("myuser", "MyPass2");
}

//returns true - which is good

Now when I enter some wrong password it validates very nicely:

using(PrincipalContext pc = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.Domain, "TheDomain"))
{
    // validate the credentials
    bool isValid = pc.ValidateCredentials("myuser", "wrongPass");
}

//returns false - which is good

Now for some odd reasons, it validates the previous last password which was MyPass1 remember?

using(PrincipalContext pc = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.Domain, "TheDomain"))
{
    // validate the credentials
    bool isValid = pc.ValidateCredentials("myuser", "MyPass1");
}

//returns true - but why? we have updated password to Mypass2

I got this code from:

Validate a username and password against Active Directory?

Is it something to do with last password expiry or is this how the validation supposed to work?

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How big is your domain infrastructure? You might connect to a different DC each time and the new password has not been replicated. –  ta.speot.is Jan 21 '12 at 0:14
    
After I update the password to a new one, I cannot login using the old password which is good. Its only when I use the ValidateCredentials() method, its returns true for the old password :( perhaps something to do with the cached credentials? –  theITvideos Jan 21 '12 at 4:14
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2 Answers 2

The reason why you are seeing this has to do with special behavior specific to NTLM network authentication.

Calling the ValidateCredentials method on a PrincipalContext instance results in a secure LDAP connection being made, followed by a bind operation being performed on that connection using a ldap_bind_s function call.

The authentication method used when calling ValidateCredentials is AuthType.Negotiate. Using this results in the bind operation being attempted using Kerberos, which (being not NTLM of course) will not exhibit the special behavior described above. However, the bind attempt using Kerberos will fail (the password being wrong and all), which will result in another attempt being made, this time using NTLM.

You have two ways to approach this:

  1. Follow the instructions in the Microsoft KB article I linked to shorten or eliminate the lifetime period of an old password using the OldPasswordAllowedPeriod registry value. Probably not the most ideal solution.
  2. Don't use PrincipleContext class to validate credentials. Now that you know (roughly) how ValidateCredentials works, it shouldn't be too difficult for you to do the process manually. What you'll want to do is create a new LDAP connection (LdapConnection), set its network credentials, set the AuthType explicitly to AuthType.Kerberos, and then call Bind(). You'll get an exception if the credentials are bad.

The following code shows how you can perform credential validation using only Kerberos. The authentication method at use will not fall back to NTLM in the event of failure.

private const int ERROR_LOGON_FAILURE = 0x31;

private bool ValidateCredentials(string username, string password, string domain)
{
    NetworkCredential credentials
        = new NetworkCredential(username, password, domain);

    LdapDirectoryIdentifier id = new LdapDirectoryIdentifier(domain);

    using(LdapConnection connection = new LdapConnection(id, credentials, AuthType.Kerberos))
    {
        connection.SessionOptions.Sealing = true;
        connection.SessionOptions.Signing = true;

        try
        {
            connection.Bind();
        }
        catch (LdapException lEx)
        {
            if (ERROR_LOGON_FAILURE == lEx.ErrorCode)
            {
                return false;
            }

            throw;
        }

    return true;
}

I try to never use exceptions to handle the flow control of my code; however, in this particular instance, the only way to test credentials on a LDAP connection seems to be to attempt a Bind operation, which will throw an exception if the credentials are bad. PrincipalContext takes the same approach.

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Thanks you for your reply. I have two questions regarding the 2 approaches. –  theITvideos Jan 21 '12 at 8:42
    
1) Is it possible to update the 'OldPasswordAllowedPeriod' thru c# or Directive Directory IDE without touching the registry? 2) So according to the Microsoft article, the default time in minutes for OldPasswordAllowedPeriod is 60 minutes... is there a way in Active directory to confirm this. 3) Can you suggest a C# code that validates the user using AuthType.Kerberos method. Taking the username and Password parameters. Please reply Thank you. –  theITvideos Jan 21 '12 at 8:55
    
I added some sample code. I'm not aware of any way to set the 'OldPasswordAllowedPeriod' registry value outside of using the standard Registry API. –  Matt Weber Jan 26 '12 at 6:21
    
LdapConnection implements IDisposable. It ought to be wrapped in a using statement or disposed in a finally block. –  Rfvgyhn Aug 3 '12 at 12:55
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Depending on the context of how you run this, it may have to do with something called "cached credentials."

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if it is something to do with cached credentials... how can I clear the password cache through c# –  theITvideos Jan 21 '12 at 4:19
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