Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got some code that I cobbled together from hints found that worked. But something is going wrong, and I am baffled. Nothing is sent to the screen, and file is empty.

Here's the program:

#!/usr/bin/env ruby -w

require "stringio"

class Tee

    def initialize
      date_str = `date '+%Y%m%d_%H%M%S'`.chomp
      @log = File.new("tee_output_example_#{date_str}.log","w")
    end

["$stdout", "$stderr"].each do |std|
   io           = eval(std)
   old_write    = io.method(:write)

   class << io
     self
   end.module_eval do
     define_method(:write) do |text|
       unless text =~ /^[\r\n]+$/       # Because puts calls twice.
         File.open(@log, "a") do |f|
#           f.puts [std[1..-1].upcase, caller[2], text].join(" ")
            f.puts text
         end
       end

       old_write.call(text)
     end
   end
 end
end

logger = Tee.new()

 logger.puts "text on stdout"
 logger.puts "Something else"

 $stdout = STDOUT
 $stderr = STDERR
 $stdout.puts "plain puts to $stdout"
 $stderr.puts "plain puts to $stderr"
share|improve this question
    
Is there a question in there? –  the Tin Man Jan 21 '12 at 3:21
    
What version of Ruby are you on? –  Joshua Cheek Jan 21 '12 at 10:58
    
And what is your acceptance test? e.g. what do you expect to see in the file and on stdout? –  Joshua Cheek Jan 21 '12 at 11:10

3 Answers 3

I managed to solve it simply with this command:

STDOUT.reopen IO.popen "tee stdout.log", "a"
STDERR.reopen IO.popen "tee stderr.log", "a"
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, nice simple solution. I think it has one unintended side effect. It appears that stderr output ends up in both log files. Perhaps because the tee command itself outputs to stdout, and stdout has been redirected to stdout.log. Example: puts 'stdout' STDERR.puts 'stderr' stderr.log: stderr stdout.log: stdout stderr –  Tyler Rick Feb 19 '13 at 19:59

Your expectations aren't very clear to me, but this seems to be a reasonable start (with several directions you could take it depending on your ultimate goal).

#!/usr/bin/env ruby -w

class Tee
  attr_accessor :log_file

  def initialize()
    self.log_file = File.open "tee_output_example_#{date_str}.log", "w"
    at_exit { log_file.close }
  end

  def date_str
    Time.now.strftime "%Y%m%d_%H%M%S"
  end

  def puts(*strings)
    log_file.puts(*strings)
    $stdout.puts(*strings)
  end
end

# will be sent to both $stdout and the logfile
logger = Tee.new
logger.puts "text on stdout"
logger.puts "Something else"

# will only be sent to $stdout or $stderr
$stdout.puts "plain puts to $stdout"
$stderr.puts "plain puts to $stderr"
share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate the solutions provided, apologize for not making problem more clear. The intention is to provide a concise way to output both to the screen and a file. –  Mark Jaffe Jan 21 '12 at 19:39

I could give some tips on debugging techniques, but instead, I'll suggest an alternate solution which might meet your needs:

class Tee
  def initialize(a,b); @a,@b = a,b; end
  def method_missing(m,*args,&b)
    @a.send(m,*args,&b)
    @b.send(m,*args,&b)
  end
end

This class is more generally useful than what you were trying to write; it takes 2 objects, and passes all method calls (including arguments and block) on to BOTH of them. So you could do something like:

tee = Tee.new(File.open("log","w"), $stdout)
tee.puts "Hello world AND log file!"
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.