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After searching and reading about Modern OpenGL in order to upgrade my existing project, I'm a bit confused, since my 3D framework based on OpenGL 2.1.

so, as far as I learn...

  • We need to generate our Vertex-Buffer-Objects from vertices, indices, normals, colors, uvs, etc.

  • then we can use GLM for matrix transformation, and we only use VBO to create or manipulate meshes, finally we pass everything into GLSL vertex shader like this...

    glm::mat4 MVP = projection * view * model;
    glUniformMatrix4fv(glGetUniformLocation(shaderProgramID, "MVP"), 1, GL_FALSE, glm::value_ptr(MVP)); //or &MVP[0][0]
    
    // uniform mat4 MVP;
    // in vec3 Vertex;
    // void main(void)
    // {
    //    gl_Position = MVP * vec4(Vertex, 1.0); //instead of ftransform();
    // }
    

QUESTION: How we do hierarchical transformations without pushMatrix/popMatrix? (or maybe we do hierarchical transformation by using our VBOs, is it possible?)

If not possible, then how to achieve same result as pushMatrix/popMatrix by using GLM and C++ < stack > library?

Lets say I need something like this:

> Set identity
> Translate to X, Y, Z
> Draw Mesh 1
> Rotate 0.5 by X axis
> Draw Mesh 2
> Scale down to 0.1
> Draw Mesh 3
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what is GLM???? –  BЈовић May 9 at 7:13
    
@BЈовић: OpenGL Mathematics (GLM), a header-only C++ library for matrix/vector math. –  genpfault May 9 at 13:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
  • We need to generate our Vertex-Buffer-Objects from vertices, indices, normals, colors, uvs, etc.

It's not really necessary to use VBOs, client side Vertex Arrays do work as well. However it's strongly recommended to use VBO, because it makes the life of the driver easier and in the long run also your's as the one who has to juggle the data. The code overhead is neglectible (it's about the same as generating and uploading texture data) and performance will only increase.

  • then we can use GLM for matrix transformation, and we only use VBO to create or manipulate meshes, finally we pass everything into GLSL vertex shader like this...

You're not limited to GLM. Any matrix math library will do. If you're looking for something you can use in C99, have a look at my (still incomplete) linmath.h https://github.com/datenwolf/linmath.h which is just a header file with static inline functions. I've yet to benchmark if the code duplication has a negative impact on performance (code size creates L1 cache pressure).

QUESTION: How we do hierarchical transformations without pushMatrix/popMatrix? (or maybe we do hierarchical transformation by using our VBOs, is it possible?)

The VBOs have nothing to do with this. What gives most users of old fashioned OpenGL trouble are those matrix stack functions, which make OpenGL look a bit like a scene graph. But it is not.

If you forget about the matrix stack of old OpenGL, it becomes obvious how to do hierarchical tranformations: At each branch in the hierarchy make a copy of the transformation matrix and operate on that. You get a hierarchical tree of transformations, at each node the corresponding matrix stored. Then you pass those matrices as uniforms to the vertex shader; or just one matrix if you're drawing a rigid object that has only one transformation. Multiple matrices you normally only need for deformables like skeletal animation of a character like this

worldtransform -> 
    pelvis ->
        left upper leg -> left lower leg -> left foot
        right upper leg -> right lower leg -> right foot
    torso ->
        neck -> head ->
             left eye
             right eye
             facial deformation // this is a whole chapter of it's own
        left upper arm -> left lower arm -> left hand
        right upper arm -> right lower arm -> right hand

Everytime you enounter a -> in such a hierachy you make a copy of the matrix and proceed working on that one. When falling back to a higher level of the tree you start working from that matrix again.

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"facial deformation" // this is a whole chapter of it's own => includes jaw drop :) –  mlvljr Feb 19 '12 at 17:16

Yes, if you need hierarchical transformations, then you have to do it on your own. However, that is pretty much trivial if all you need is a stack. Just take the last entry on the stack and multiply it with the next matrix you want to apply, and push the result onto the stack.

[On your edited question]: You don't need a stack at all for this, and there's no hierarchical transformation either. Just have a single matrix and apply your translation, draw, multiply it with your rotation matrix, draw, multiply your scaling, draw.

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1  
Er? If you have the initial matrix M, and the translation T, the rotation R, and the scale S, then your first matrix is M=T, the second is M*=R = (TR == translation first, rotation second), and the third is M*=S = (TR*S == all matrices.) For a robot arm, you can just as well start at the top and issue draw calls while going down your tree. It doesn't matter if the "stack" is a std::stack or just part of your recursive scene traversal routine. –  Anteru Jan 21 '12 at 8:30
    
If you don't do M*=S, but just use MS (copy!) then the original matrix is not changed. Your stack would look like this: [M], then you push T (resulting in a stack [M, MT]), then you pop ([M]), then push again R ([M, M*R]). I don't get your problem? –  Anteru Jan 21 '12 at 8:33
    
Stop editing the meaning of your comments. I said you can implement it via a stack, or that you can just copy your matrices inside your recursive draw function (which implicitly creates a stack.) The [M, ..] is a stack, if you want this, just use it. But you can easily get away without any std::stack as well. –  Anteru Jan 21 '12 at 8:38
    
let us continue this discussion in chat –  Anteru Jan 21 '12 at 8:43
1  
You can also use code like this: pastebin.com/RVg2Guyf –  Anteru Jan 21 '12 at 8:44

If your rendering already happens hierarchically using, for example, function recursion then you already have matrix stack!

void renderMesh(Matrix transform, Mesh mesh)
{
    // here call glDrawElements/glDrawArrays and send transform matrix to MVP uniform
    mesh->draw(transform);

    // now render all the sub-meshes, then will be transformed relative to current mesh
    for (int i=0; i<mesh->subMeshCount(); i++)
    {
        Matrix subMeshTransform = mesh->getSubMeshTransform(i);
        Mesh subMesh = mesh->getSubMesh();

        renderMesh(subMeshTransform * transform, subMesh);
    }
}

// somwhere in main function
...
Matrix projection = Matrix::perspective(...);
Matrix view = camera->getViewMatrix();

Matrix transform = view * projectIon;
renderMesh(transform, rootMesh);
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In regard to VAO and VBO performance I disagree that VBO is faster, I suggest to see this link

http://www.openglsuperbible.com/2013/12/09/vertex-array-performance/

You can see from the results above that, at least for our small sample set, VAO is faster on all implementations. It stands to reason — there are less parameters to validate when calling glBindVertexArray than either glBindBuffer or glVertexAttribPointer. Even when there is only a single vertex attribute, there are half as many calls into OpenGL with a VAO switch than with explicit update of a global VAO. Besides the obvious “fewer API calls means faster execution” relationship, the VAO is a place that an OpenGL driver can stash information required to program the underlying GPU. The total amount of state changes sent to the GPU is the same either way.

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How is this related to the question? –  Reto Koradi May 9 at 6:34

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