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I have the following piece of c code,

double findIntraClustSimFullCoverage(cluster * pCluster)
{
    double sum = 0;
    register int i = 0, j = 0;
    double perElemSimilarity = 0;

    for (i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
    {
        perElemSimilarity = 0;

        for (j = 0; j < 10000; j++)
        {

            perElemSimilarity += arr[i][j];

        }
        perElemSimilarity /= pCluster->size;
        sum += perElemSimilarity;
    }
    return (sum / pCluster->size);
}

NOTE: arr is a matrix of size 10000 X 10000

This is a portion of a GA code, hence this nested for loop runs many times. This affects the performance of the code i.e. takes hell a lot of time to give the results. I profiled the code using valgrind / kcachegrind. This indicated that 70 % of the process execution time was spent in running this nested for loop. The register variables i and j, do not seem to be stored in register values (profiling with and without "register" keyword indicated this)

I simply can not find a way to optimize this nested for loop portion of code (as it is very simple and straight forward). Please help me in optimizing this portion of code.

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4  
The register keyword is pretty much ignored by all modern compilers. So don't expect to see a difference. –  Mysticial Jan 21 '12 at 8:40
    
arr is matrix of doubles? –  psur Jan 21 '12 at 8:42
1  
How often is arr updated? Maybe it's better to recalculate the value dynamically on each update? –  default locale Jan 21 '12 at 8:43
    
Yes, arr is a 2D array of doubles. The array arr is not updated at all. I will write the values of all the array subscripts only once and then on, I keep reading it. –  Annamalai Jan 21 '12 at 9:37
    
Good on you for profiling your code before optimising, it seems to be too common to do it the other way around unfortunately... –  dreamlax Jan 21 '12 at 10:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm assuming that you change the arr matrix frequently, else you could just compute the sum (see Lucian's answer) once and remember it.

You can use a similar approach when you modify the matrix. Instead of completely re-computing the sum after the matrix has (likely) been changed, you can store a 'sum' value somewhere, and have every piece of code that updates the matrix update the stored sum appropriately. For instance, assuming you start with an array of all zeros:

double arr[10000][10000];
< initialize it to all zeros >
double sum = 0;

// you want set arr[27][53] to 82853
sum -= arr[27][53];
arr[27][53] = 82853;
sum += arr[27][53];

// you want set arr[27][53] to 473
sum -= arr[27][53];
arr[27][53] = 473;
sum += arr[27][53];

You might want to completely re-calculate the sum from time to time to avoid accumulation of errors.

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I might be wrong here, but isn't the following equivalent:

for (i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
{
    for (j = 0; j < 10000; j++)
    {
        sum += arr[i][j];
    }
}
return (sum / ( pCluster->size * pCluster->size ) );
share|improve this answer
    
Summing so many elements in one variable can be unsafe due to overflow. But it depends on values stored in arr –  psur Jan 21 '12 at 8:48
    
@psur ah, you're right. But maybe the values can also be negative or really small. Maybe the op can give us some more details... But other than that, it's the same, right? –  Luchian Grigore Jan 21 '12 at 8:50
    
Summing two elements can be unsafe for overflow. It's a question of order, which is only determinable with the scale of the input data; which I don't think is given. –  rvalue Jan 21 '12 at 9:39
    
Yes, Luchian Grigore, you are right. The arr contains decimal values ranging from 0 to 1.4. Seemingly, there is no chance of overflow here (as the values are mostly close to zero). –  Annamalai Jan 21 '12 at 9:48
    
I checked the change suggested by Luchian Grigore, still the time spent in the nested for loop id 70.63 %. Just, adding some more information here, the for loop containing j runs for 21.59 % of time and the line sum += arr[i][j] runs for 46.94 % of the time. –  Annamalai Jan 21 '12 at 10:00

If you're sure that you have no option for algorithmic optimization, you'll have to rely on very low level optimizations to speed up your code. These are very platform/compiler specific so your mileage may vary.

It is probable that, at some point, the bottleneck of the operation is pulling the values of arr from the memory. So make sure that your data is laid out in a linear cache friendly way. That is to say that &arr[i][j+1] - &arr[i][j] == sizeof(double).

You may also try to unroll your inner loop, in case your compiler does not already do it. Your code :

    for (j = 0; j < 10000; j++)
    {
        perElemSimilarity += arr[i][j];
    }

Would for example become :

    for (j = 0; j < 10000; j+=10)
    {
        perElemSimilarity += arr[i][j+0];
        perElemSimilarity += arr[i][j+1];
        perElemSimilarity += arr[i][j+2];
        perElemSimilarity += arr[i][j+3];
        perElemSimilarity += arr[i][j+4];
        perElemSimilarity += arr[i][j+5];
        perElemSimilarity += arr[i][j+6];
        perElemSimilarity += arr[i][j+7];
        perElemSimilarity += arr[i][j+8];
        perElemSimilarity += arr[i][j+9];
    }

These are the basic ideas, difficult to say more without knowing your platform, compiler, looking at the generated assembly code.

You might want to take a look at this presentation for more complete examples of optimization opportunities.

If you need even more performance, you could take a look at SIMD intrinsics for your platform, of try to use, say OpenMP, to distribute your computation on multiple threads.


Another step would be to try with OpenMP, something along the following (untested) :

#pragma omp parallel for private(perElemSimilarity) reduction(+:sum)
for (i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
{
    perElemSimilarity = 0;
    /* INSERT INNER LOOP HERE */
    perElemSimilarity /= pCluster->size;
    sum += perElemSimilarity;
}

But note that even if you bring this portion of code to 0% (which is impossible) of your execution time, your GA algorithm will still take hours to run. Your performance bottleneck is elsewhere now that this portion of code takes 'only' 22% of your running time.

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loop unrolling is probably something to leave for the compiler's optimizer, it's a recognizable construct and easily optimized. –  dreamlax Jan 21 '12 at 10:37
    
@Rotoglup, I did UNROLLING as you have suggested. It reduces the running time of nested for loop from 70 % to 22%. Thanks first off, for your suggestion. But still, since it takes 22% of the execution time, my GA code takes hours together to converge. Could you/anyone else help me further optimize this portion of code? –  Annamalai Jan 21 '12 at 18:27
    
@Annamalai What is your compiler ? OS ? CPU ? Did you turn on compile-time optimization flags for your compiler ? –  rotoglup Jan 21 '12 at 19:03
    
I am using Ubuntu linux and Mac os lion in parallel. Using gcc compiler. In Mac os, the compiler version is gcc4.2.1 and on ubuntu gcc 4.6.1. I have turned-on the O2 compilation flag. –  Annamalai Jan 22 '12 at 3:32
    
edited my answer with some more suggestion regarding OpenMP –  rotoglup Jan 22 '12 at 11:42
  1. The register keyword is an optimizer hint, if the optimizer doesn't think the register is well spent there, it won't be.
  2. Is the matrix well packed, i.e. is it a contiguous block of memory?
  3. Is 'j' the minor index (i.e. are you going from one element to the next in memory), or are you jumping from one element to that plus 1000?
  4. Is arr fairly static? Is this called more than once on the same arr? The result of the inner loop only depends on the row/column that j traverses, so calculating it lazily and storing it for future reference will make a big difference
share|improve this answer
    
2. Yes, the array is a continuous block of memory. 3.j increments in a discontinuous fashion. 4. I am not able to understand your fourth comment, kindly, could you elaborate on this? –  Annamalai Jan 21 '12 at 9:51
1  
Don't answer the question with more questions. –  dreamlax Jan 21 '12 at 10:33

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