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I have a survey on a website, and there seems to be some issues with the users hitting enter (I don't know why) and accidentally submitting the survey (form) without clicking the submit button. Is there a way to prevent this? I'm using html, php 5.2.9, and jquery on the survey.

share|improve this question
    
I think the term "accidentally" is fairly clear on the matter. –  AnthonyWJones May 21 '09 at 21:27
3  
wow, why is this so popular all of a sudden? –  DForck42 May 4 '11 at 15:26

20 Answers 20

up vote 266 down vote accepted

You can use a method such as

$(document).ready(function() {
  $(window).keydown(function(event){
    if(event.keyCode == 13) {
      event.preventDefault();
      return false;
    }
  });
});

In reading the comments on the original post, to make it more usable and allow people to press enter if they have completed all the fields

function validationFunction() {
  $('input').each(function() {
    ...

  }
  if(good) {
    return true;
  } 
  return false;
}

$(document).ready(function() {
  $(window).keydown(function(event){
    if( (event.keyCode == 13) && (validationFunction() == false) ) {
      event.preventDefault();
      return false;
    }
  });
});
share|improve this answer
1  
I'm currently just looking for a quick fix, and don't have time to implement validation items. I appreciate everyone's answers, but this is the one i'm going to go with in the mean time. thank you. –  DForck42 May 22 '09 at 13:42
1  
$(window) didn't work for me. I had to use $(document). –  Kevin Pauli Nov 10 '10 at 19:04
    
Hi @Simon_Weaver and @Phil-carter - My code happens in a switch case statement $searchBox.keyup(function (event) switch (event.keyCode){ case 13: event.preventDefault(); return false; break; ... then there's a bunch of other key codes being checked. In my case, this solution is not working at all. Any ideas why? –  Jacques Mar 11 '11 at 8:04
1  
This method is unideal because it prevents the user from submitting the form by pressing enter while focused on the submit button. The best solution would be that of BalusC below, where enter is interrupted only while still focused on the form inputs. –  Anson Kao Oct 19 '11 at 17:25
1  
I've seen situations (Internet Explorer only) where you need to bind to keydown on the document instead of the window for this to work. –  MartinHN Feb 22 '12 at 9:03

If you don't have a textarea in your form, then just add the following to your <form>:

<form onkeypress="return event.keyCode != 13;">

This will cause that every key press inside the form will be checked on the keyCode. If it is not 13 (the Enter key), then it will return true and anything will go as expected. If it is 13 (the Enter key), then it will return false and anything will stop immediately, so the form won't be submitted.

If you have a textarea in your form (which of course should accept the Enter key), then add the keypress functions to every separate input element which shouldn't submit the form on pressing of the Enter key, e.g. <input> and <select>. You can do this with jQuery as well:

$('input,select').keypress(function(event) { return event.keyCode != 13; });
share|improve this answer
3  
+1 for your second suggestion using the jQuery selector - allowing use of Enter elsewhere on the page. –  Anson Kao Oct 19 '11 at 17:26
1  
Comment by anonymous user: This code does not work in FF 4.0.1 without an argument (event is not defined). Fix: function() should be replaced by function(event). –  Anne Dec 7 '11 at 20:08
12  
If you want all inputs except textareas, you can do $(':input').not('textarea').keypress... –  Nathan Long Jan 10 '12 at 20:34
1  
this is the easiest way... –  Ivory Santos Jan 12 '13 at 3:38
3  
It's worth noting that using "return false" will prevent the event from propagating to other handlers. For most scenarios this will be OK, but if you have defined multiple keypress/keydown/keyup event handlers they may not be fired. A better alternative is $('input,select').keypress(function(event) {if (event.keyCode == 13) {event.preventDefault();}}). See fuelyourcoding.com/jquery-events-stop-misusing-return-false –  Peter Bailey Dec 10 '13 at 10:32

I had to catch all 3 events related to pressing keys in order to prevent form from being submitted:

    var preventSubmit = function(event) {
        if(event.keyCode == 13) {
            log("caught ya!");
            event.preventDefault();
            //event.stopPropagation();
            return false;
        }
    }
    $("#search").keypress(preventSubmit);
    $("#search").keydown(preventSubmit);
    $("#search").keyup(preventSubmit);

Update: you can combine all the above into a nice compact version:

    $('#search').bind('keypress keydown keyup', function(e){
       if(e.keyCode == 13) { e.preventDefault(); }
    });
share|improve this answer
1  
This solution worked for me when a simple keypress didn't. Thanks. –  crmpicco Nov 8 '12 at 12:24
2  
You could either chain the last 3 selectors or bind multiple events with one method like so $("#search").bind('keypress keyup keydown',preventSubmit); –  Moak Jan 3 '13 at 2:38
    
Because in an ASP.NET web form everything has to be nested in a <form> tag, the enter key will submit the form... This solution disabled the enter key and fixed the problem though, thanks @Dave! Then I enabled the enter key for certain fields by id. –  Ian Campbell Aug 9 '13 at 18:23

Instead of preventing users from clicking Enter, which may seem unnatural, you can leave the form as is and add some extra client-side validation: when the survey is not finished the result is not sent to the server and user gets a nice message telling what needs to be finished to complete the form. If you are using jquery, try the Validation plugin:

http://docs.jquery.com/Plugins/Validation

This will require more work than catching the Enter button, but surely it will provide a richer user experience.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree with taking this approach –  Matt Refghi May 21 '09 at 21:37
5  
This sounds good but optional fields are problematic, the user may press enter by mistake and the form will be submitted. I do not see how you are going to know when the survey is not finished unless you put every field as required (no default choices, no blank fields allowed...) –  Christophe Roussy Jan 30 '13 at 11:00

nice simply little jquery solution:

$("form").bind("keypress", function (e) {
    if (e.keyCode == 13) {
        return false;
    }
});
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 I was looking for a jQuery alternative, instead of using normal JS like var key = event.keyCode || event.which; if (key == 13) return false; –  RaphaelDDL Dec 13 '11 at 13:38
1  
technically this is still POJ just with a simpler jquery wrapper. the code that you've given is nearly the same thing. –  Eonasdan Dec 13 '11 at 14:03

If you use script to do the actual submit, then you can add "return false" line to the onsbumit handler like this:

<form onsubmit="return false;">

calling submit() on the form from JavaScript will not trigger the event.

share|improve this answer
$(document).on('keyup keypress', 'form input[type="text"]', function(e) {
  if(e.keyCode == 13) {
    e.preventDefault();
    return false;
  }
});

This solution works on all forms on website (also on forms inserted with ajax), preventing only Enters in input texts. Place it in a document ready function, and forget this problem for a life.

share|improve this answer
    
I think the original answer e.which was fine; no need to change it to e.keyCode. Both return the value 13 for the enter key. See stackoverflow.com/a/4471635/292060 and stackoverflow.com/a/18184976/292060 –  goodeye Sep 14 at 16:23
    
Works Great. Thank you! –  Kuletzxc Sep 16 at 9:07

Giving the form an action of 'javascript:void(0);' seems to do the trick

<form action="javascript:void(0);">
<input type="text" />
</form>
<script>
$(document).ready(function() {
    $(window).keydown(function(event){
        if(event.keyCode == 13) {
    alert('Hello');
        }
    });
});
</script>
share|improve this answer
    
This actually works for my case. Thanks @sidarcy –  Milacay Jul 23 at 0:21

You could make a javascript method to check to see if the enter key was hit, and if it is, to stop the submit.

<script type="text/javascript">
  function noenter() {
  return !(window.event && window.event.keyCode == 13); }
</script>

Just call that on the submit method.

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I needed to prevent only specific inputs from submitting, so I used a class selector, to let this be a "global" feature wherever I need it.

<input id="txtEmail" name="txtEmail" class="idNoEnter" .... />

And this jquery:

$('.idNoEnter').keydown(function (e) {
  if (e.keyCode == 13) {
    e.preventDefault();
  }
});

Alternatively, if keydown is insufficient:

$('.idNoEnter').on('keypress keydown keyup', function (e) {
   if (e.keyCode == 13) {
     e.preventDefault();
   }
});

Some notes:

Modifying various good answers here, the enter key seems to work for keydown on all the browsers. For the alternative, I updated bind() to the on() method.

I'm a big fan of class selectors, weighing all the pros and cons and performance discussions. My naming convention is 'idSomething' to indicate jquery is using it as an id, to separate it from css styling.

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will this work for the submit button only? –  Sickest May 31 at 18:29
    
This works on the textbox elements in the form. As you type, and hit enter in the textbox, the default behavior submits the form. This intercepts the enter key and prevents it from submitting. –  goodeye Jun 1 at 21:37

This has worked for me in all browsers after much frustration with other solutions. The name_space outer function is just to stay away from declaring globals, something I also recommend.

$(function() {window.name_space = new name_space();}); //jquery doc ready
function name_space() {
    this.is_ie = (navigator.userAgent.indexOf("MSIE") !== -1);

    this.stifle = function(event) {
        event.cancelBubble;
        event.returnValue = false;
        if(this.is_ie === false) {
            event.preventDefault();
        }
        return false;
    }

    this.on_enter = function(func) {
        function catch_key(e) {
            var enter = 13;
            if(!e) {
                var e = event;
            }
            keynum = GetKeyNum(e);
            if (keynum === enter) {
                if(func !== undefined && func !== null) {
                    func();
                }
                return name_space.stifle(e);
            }
            return true; // submit
        }

        if (window.Event) {
            window.captureEvents(Event.KEYDOWN);
            window.onkeydown = catch_key;
        }
        else {
            document.onkeydown = catch_key;
        }

        if(name_space.is_ie === false) {
            document.onkeypress = catch_key;    
        }
    }
}

Sample use:

$(function() {
    name_space.on_enter(
        function () {alert('hola!');}
    );
});
share|improve this answer

I had a similiar problem, where I had a grid with "ajax textfields" (Yii CGridView) and just one submit button. Everytime I did a search on a textfield and hit enter the form submitted. I had to do something with the button because it was the only common button between the views (MVC pattern). All I had to do was remove type="submit" and put onclick="document.forms[0].submit()

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In my specific case I had to stop ENTER from submitting the form and also simulate the clicking of the submit button. This is because the submit button had a click handler on it because we were within a modal window (inherited old code). In any case here's my combo solutions for this case.

    $('input,select').keypress(function(event) {
        // detect ENTER key
        if (event.keyCode == 13) {
            // simulate submit button click
            $("#btn-submit").click();
            // stop form from submitting via ENTER key press
            event.preventDefault ? event.preventDefault() : event.returnValue = false;
        }
    });

This use case is specifically useful for people working with IE8.

share|improve this answer
// validate your form using jQuery onsubmit function.. It'll really work..

$(document).ready(function(){
   $(#form).submit(e){
       e.preventDefault();
       if(validation())
          document.form1.submit();
   });
});

function validation()
{
   //your form checking goes here.
}

<form id='form1' method='POST' action=''>
 //your form data
</form>
share|improve this answer

I have an simpler and elegant way to do this..

create an validate function which returns true or false (with your business logic inside it)

and add this code to your script

$(function() {
    $('your form selector').submit(function() {
        return validate();
    });
});
share|improve this answer

This works for me

jQuery.each($("#your_form_id").find('input'), function(){
    $(this).bind('keypress keydown keyup', function(e){
       if(e.keyCode == 13) { e.preventDefault(); }
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks peter. Short and to the point. –  Aaron Jul 23 '13 at 19:38

I think it's well covered with all the answers, but if you are using a button with some JavaScript validation code you could just set the form's onkeypress for Enter to call your submit as expected:

<form method="POST" action="..." onkeypress="if(event.keyCode == 13) mySubmitFunction(this); return false;">

The onkeypress JS could be whatever you need to do. There's no need for a larger, global change. This is especially true if you're not the one coding the app from scratch, and you've been brought into fix someone else's web site without tearing it apart and re-testing it.

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I realize its a variant on Tom Hubbard's answer, which I +1'd because its actually what I did myself today before searching SO for other ideas. –  garlicman Jul 28 '13 at 17:58

I can't commet yet, so I'll post a new answer

Accepted answer is ok-ish, but it wasn't stoping submit on numpad enter. At least in current version of Chrome. I had to alter the keycode condition to this, then it works.

if(event.keyCode == 13 || event.keyCode == 169) {...}
share|improve this answer

I'd like to add a little coffee script (not field tested)

$ ->
    $(window).bind 'keypress', (event) ->
        if event.keyCode == 13
            unless {'TEXTAREA', 'SELECT'}[event.originalEvent.srcElement.tagName]
                event.preventDefault() 

(I hope you like the nice trick in the unless clause)

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I would avoid any client side validation as that could be easily turned off, and forcing users to have javascript enabled is just silly.

Just do some server side validation based on your required fields in your app/survey. You may want to check the TABINDEX attribute of your inputs, perhaps tabbing from the first field is giving focus to the submit button.

Disabling buttons or not allowing them is horrible for usability.

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