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I have a class that is IComparable:

public class a : IComparable
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public a(int id)
    {
        this.Id = id;
    }

    public int CompareTo(object obj)
    {
        return this.Id.CompareTo(((a)obj).Srl);
    }
}

When I add a list of object of this class to a hash set:

a a1 = new a(1);
a a2 = new a(2);
HashSet<a> ha = new HashSet<a>();
ha.add(a1);
ha.add(a2);
ha.add(a1);

Everything is fine and ha.count = 2, but:

a a1 = new a(1);
a a2 = new a(2);
HashSet<a> ha = new HashSet<a>();
ha.add(a1);
ha.add(a2);
ha.add(new a(1));

Now ha.count = 3.

  1. Why doesn't HashSet respect a's CompareTo method.
  2. Is HashSet the best way to have a list of unique objects?
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3 Answers 3

up vote 29 down vote accepted

It uses an IEqualityComparer<T> (EqualityComparer<T>.Default unless you specify a different one on construction).

When you add an element to the set, it will find the hash code using IEqualityComparer<T>.GetHashCode, and store both the hash code and the element (after checking whether the element is already in the set, of course).

To look an element up, it will first use the IEqualityComparer<T>.GetHashCode to find the hash code, then for all elements with the same hash code, it will use IEqualityComparer<T>.Equals to compare for actual equality.

Note how none of this is in terms of an ordered comparison - which makes sense, as there are certainly situations where you can easily specify equality but not a total ordering. This is all the same as Dictionary<TKey, TValue>, basically.

If you want a set which uses ordering instead of just equality comparisons, you should use SortedSet<T> from .NET 4 - which allows you to specify an IComparer<T> instead of an IEqualityComparer<T>. This will use IComparer<T>.Compare - which will delegate to IComparable<T>.CompareTo or IComparable.CompareTo if you're using Comparer<T>.Default.

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2  
+1 Also note @tyriker's answer (that IMO should be a comment here) which points out that the simplest way to leverage said IEqualityComparer<T>.GetHashCode/Equals() is to implement Equals and GetHashCode on T itself (and while you're doing that, you'd also implement the strongly typed counterpart:- bool IEquatable<T>.Equals(T other) ) –  Ruben Bartelink May 16 '13 at 9:05
    
Although very accurate this answer may be somewhat confusing, especially for new users as it doesn't clearly state that for the simplest case overriding Equals and GetHashCode is enough - as mentioned in @tyriker's answer. –  BartoszKP Oct 2 '13 at 7:35

Here's clarification on a part of the answer that's been left unsaid: The object type of your HashSet<T> doesn't have to implement IEqualityComparer<T> but instead just has to override Object.GetHashCode() and Object.Equals(Object obj).

Instead of this:

public class a : IEqualityComparer<a>
{
  public int GetHashCode(a obj) { /* Implementation */ }
  public bool Equals(a obj1, a obj2) { /* Implementation */ }
}

You do this:

public class a
{
  public override int GetHashCode() { /* Implementation */ }
  public override bool Equals(a obj) { /* Implementation */ }
}

It is subtle, but this tripped me up for the better part of a day trying to get HashSet to function the way it is intended. And like others have said, HashSet<a> will end up calling a.GetHashCode() and a.Equals(obj) as necessary when working with the set.

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Good point - thanks! –  vladimir77 Apr 19 '13 at 15:35
    
Good point. BTW as mentioned on my comment on @JonSkeet's answer, you should also implement bool IEquatable<T>.Equals(T other) for a slight efficiency gain but more importantly the clarity benefit. For obv reasons, in addition to the need to implement GetHashCode alongside IEquatable<T>, the doc for IEquatable<T> mentions that for consistency purposes you should also override the object.Equals for consistency –  Ruben Bartelink May 16 '13 at 9:09

HashSet uses Equals and GetHashCode().

CompareTo is for ordered sets.

If you want unique objects, but you don't care about their iteration order, HashSet<T> is typically the best choice.

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