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I am new to Rails and just got my category tree working. Now I am not sure if what I have done is "ruby conform" or "ruby-like". I come from PHP and have to change some of my habits but this is not easy. I just want to check if I am on the right way.

The structure is done by the scaffold-command so I guess its correct. So obvisoulythere is a model-class which is called Category and inherits from ActiveRecord::Base. This model has the following attributes/database fields:

*id,media,image,small_image,clicks,parent,active,description,name,created_at,updated_at*

This is the content of my model-class:

class Category < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many    :articles,
                :foreign_key => 'category'

  belongs_to  :parent_object,
                :foreign_key  => "parent",
                :class_name => "Category"
  has_many     :children,
                :foreign_key  => "parent",
                :class_name => "Category",
                :order  => "name ASC",
                :dependent => :delete_all

  @tree = Hash.new
  @treepart = Hash.new

  def self.category_tree
    @root_categories = self.find(:all, :conditions => ["parent = ?", 0])
    if @root_categories.length >= 1
      @root_categories.each do |level|
          @tree[level.id] = level.child_loop(level)
      end
      @tree
    end
  end

  def child_loop(child)
      @treepart = { :category => child }
      @treepart[:children] = Hash.new
      child.children.each do |child|
        @treepart[:children][child.id] = child.child_loop(child)
      end
    @treepart
  end
end

Categories can be nested therefore I have integrated a self-relating belongs_to and has_many function. I have called the parent *:parent_object* because only :parent does not work. Maybe it is in conflict with the attribute-name.

In the model I collect all categories with the method *category_tree* and *child_loop*. After this call I get an image of the category-tree in form of a hash.

Category.category_tree

I do this directly in the Articles´ *_form.html.erb* and pass it to my helper which is generating the html. Here is the call from the from-template:

<%= build_category_tree(Category.category_tree).html_safe  %>

The helper is rendering as follows:

module CategoriesHelper

  def build_category_tree(object_tree)
    tree = object_tree
    @treestring = "<ul>" + self.level_loop(tree) + "</ul>"
  end

 def level_loop(level)
   @levelstring = ''
   if !level.nil?
      level.each do |id,item|
        if item.has_key?(:category) && !item.nil?
          @levelstring += "<li>" + item[:category].name + "</li>"
          @levelstring += "<ul>" + self.level_loop(item[:children]) + "</ul>"
        end
      end
   end
   # in the end, return string to prevent a nil return
   @levelstring += ""
 end
end

Is this the ruby-way to code, can I shorten or change something completely? Thanks for your help

share|improve this question
    
While I am looking for a full answer, one thing that is definitely not Rails Way is the extensive use of foreign keys that are not 'id'. The associated models (ones that use has_many and belongs_to) assume presence of 'parent_model_id' attribute in a child model. has_many and belongs_to then should not have any special reference to foreign key - the parent_model_id is assumed as a foreign key. –  Alexei Danchenkov Jan 21 '12 at 11:16
    
This might be a better question for code review codereview.stackexchange.com –  Beerlington Jan 21 '12 at 15:07
    
@AlexeiDanchenkov Thanks for that hint, id did this many times. But in the case of articles and categories, the articles can have more than one category. Is it related the same way and ruby does the things with the comma separated ids? Beerlington, I knew nothing about codereview until now. Thanks I will check it out –  Oliver Jan 24 '12 at 20:07
    
In case an article can have more than one category, use :has_and_belongs_to_many association or :has_many, :through association. None of these imply changing the foreign key from 'id'. Is there a valid reason to change the foreign key? –  Alexei Danchenkov Jan 24 '12 at 20:55
    
No there is no reason to change the foreign key names. Thanks for your help so far. It is important for me to learn the right way right from the start. Are there any other things which could be better? –  Oliver Jan 25 '12 at 20:58

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