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For example:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string>
int main() {
    std::string* stuff(NULL);

    printf("allocating memory..."); //line 2

    stuff = new std::string[500000000]; //line 3

    delete [] stuff; //line 4

    return 0;
}

when executed runs line 3 (and possibly line 4) before line 2. Now I know this is probably some good optimization feature but sometimes the right order is needed.

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7  
What makes you think that line 2 is run after line 3? (It most likely is not.) –  Mat Jan 21 '12 at 9:55
    
@Michael Krelin - hacker: I just thought of that too, which is why I deleted my last comment. :-) –  In silico Jan 21 '12 at 10:00
    
@Insilico, and I deleted mine because you deleted yours and because I've just seen the answer hinting at this :) –  Michael Krelin - hacker Jan 21 '12 at 10:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The problem is here:

printf("allocating memory..."); //line 2

In many architectures you have buffered output, which means that what you print on the screen is not shown immediately but stored in a memory buffer. To flush the buffer and ensure that he is printed immediately, you can use

printf("allocating memory...\n"); //line 2 with the \n character that flushes the buffer

although I didn't find anything to prove this besides personal experience, or alternatively, if you don't want to go to a new line (and be absolutely sure of flushing) you can use fflush(stdout) right after line 2.

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3  
I don't think \n guarantees flushing (unlike c++ std::endl). –  Michael Krelin - hacker Jan 21 '12 at 10:00
    
@MichaelKrelin-hacker I had thought of that too, that's why I'm searching for some references. –  Narrakan Jan 21 '12 at 10:04
5  
The behaviour is inherited from C (7.19.3 of C99). Streams may be unbuffered, line buffered or fully buffered. Standard error is not fully buffered and standard out is only allowed to be fully buffered if it is determined not to be connected to an interactive device. This allows stdout to be line buffered or unbuffered and it is usually line buffered on most 'unices' meaning that a newline character will flush it. –  Charles Bailey Jan 21 '12 at 10:18
    
Thanks, @CharlesBailey, I knew it's a common experience, but I thought there's no guarantee. Thanks for the reference. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Jan 21 '12 at 11:01
    
Ah ok I didn't know printf had the buffering but now I know what flush() does. thanks –  Tom Peety Jan 21 '12 at 12:19

In C++, you might want to write it like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
int main() {
    std::string* stuff(NULL);

    std::cout << "allocating memory..."; //line 2
    std::cout.flush();   // ensures the buffer is actually written to the terminal right here

    stuff = new std::string[500000000]; //line 3

    delete [] stuff; //line 4

    return 0;
}
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-O0 flag disables all optimizations in GCC.

But the effect you are observing is most probably not due to an optimization but rather a result of file IO buffering.

Inserting fflush(stdout) just after printf(...) will make IO system flush the buffer which in case of logging to a file should give you the right order of events (assuming you are logging malloc() calls to the same file and this is where you observe out of order events).

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