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Is there any way to add a SQL Server Database Diagram to source control? I can't seem to find a way to script it out of the database. If so, is there a way to get that diagram into a Visual Studio Database Project for easy deployment?

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Hmmm... sorry for asking this, but are you certain that you should version control this, instead of the (SQL DDL) code? –  Treb May 21 '09 at 21:28
    
@Treb, he didn't say he wanted the diagram to replace the DDL code. –  Sam Aug 15 '13 at 5:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

to script it to a file try:

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/database/ScriptDiagram2005.aspx

I would not do this.

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+0.1 for the lkink, and +0.9 for not doing it (after reading the article ;-) –  Treb May 21 '09 at 21:34
    
Altered version of the above joelmansford.wordpress.com/2008/04/01/… via @joel-mansford –  Tim Abell Sep 11 '14 at 9:21
    
And now there's a modified version of that too: github.com/timabell/database-diagram-scm –  Tim Abell Oct 23 '14 at 11:02

I've been allowed to publish my variation on a set of scripts that do just that, providing easy two-way import/export between files and diagrams stored in a database.

https://github.com/timabell/database-diagram-scm

Just run the batch file, pointing at your database of choice and you'll get a set of files, one for each diagram. Unfortunately the data is still binary, but it's a start.

It builds on what others have already done, definitely a shoulders of giants job. :-)

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There isn't really an easy way of doing this. I typically do one of a few things for this.

  1. Simply print the document to PDF using something like CutePDF
  2. Use Visio and the Reverse Engineering option to generate the document, then save the visio file
  3. Use Enterprise Architect or similar tool for the process.

I personally use option 3, due to the lifecycle that I take my applications through. But the real thing is what are you looking to store, if it is a static version of the database diagram, any of the above are valid.

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I don't know what the advantage of storing the diagram in source control would be. The database diagrams put an illustration to your database relationships which should be defined elsewhere. So long as you put the creation scripts for your DB in source safe, the diagram should render just fine when you create it and add your tables to it.

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You can move entities around in ways that imply grouping on a database diagram which is not explicitly stated in the schema. Yes, the relationships can be generated automatically, but the layout cannot. Have you ever created a new database diagram with all the tables in your database and been satisfied with the layout? –  brian May 22 '09 at 17:00
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I don't spend that much time with SQL's database diagrams for that very reason. If I needed to give a model to a user or someone else, I would probably consider using Visio or another ER Diagram tool. For me the SQL models are for a quick reference as to what the structures and relationships are. Not something I would view as a permanent item. –  RSolberg May 22 '09 at 17:20
    
-1 for suggesting that developers recreate the diagrams each time they need them and for not actually telling the asker how to do what he/she wanted. –  Sam Aug 15 '13 at 4:35
    
Recreate what? A relationship that should exist with FK relationships already? –  RSolberg Aug 20 '13 at 22:30

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