Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have read that dealloc for an object will be called, only if retain count of that object becomes zero.

I am taking one object for UIColor in interface section and setting property

UIColor *currentColor;
@property (nonatomic, retain) UIColor *currentColor;

After using this object in the implemetation section, I am calling release method for this object in dealloc

-(void)dealloc
{
    [currentColor release];
    [super dealloc];
}

I am in doubt how dealloc will be called for this object, because I am not releasing the retained object anywhere. Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I have read that dealloc for an object will be called, only if retain count of that object becomes zero.

Yes.

For the sake of simplicity, call the class that contains currentColor object as ColorContainer. Now, if you create an instance of ColorContainer like the following:

ColorContainer* containerColor = [[ColorContainer alloc] init]; // retain count + 1

the retain count for containerColor becomes 1.

Suppose you create an instance of a UIColor and you set that instance to currentColor property. In this case you can follow two different ways. In the first one you can create an instance like the following. If you use an instance method like initWithRed:green:blue:alpha: you have to release memory explicitly.

UIColor color* = [[UIColor alloc] initWithRed:0 green:0 blue:0 alpha:1]; // retain count + 1
containerColor.currentColor = color; // retain count +1, the referenced object has a retain count of 2 because you use a retain policy
[color release]; // retain count -1, now  the referenced object has a retain count of 1

In the second way, instead, you could use a class method (+ symbol). In this case you don't need to release memory explicity because the object created in that class method will be autoreleased at a certain point of your application lifetime.

containerColor.currentColor = [UIColor whiteColor]; // retain count +1

Now suppose you release containerColor object. If the retain count for containerColor is equal to 1, releasing it from an object that uses it, it enables to call its dealloc method and, in consequence, to dismiss also the object referenced by currentColor.

In this simple case study you have to note that the object referenced by currentColor is completely removed from memory (dismissed) only if it has a retain count of 1. In fact, if you do this

UIColor color* = [[UIColor alloc] initWithRed:0 green:0 blue:0 alpha:1]; // retain count + 1
containerColor.currentColor = color; // retain count +1, the referenced object has a retain count of 2
//[color release];

you create a memory leak (Do you understand way?).

To summarize, when you use retain, copy, init or new (it's the same of alloc-init), you have always to call their counterparts release or autorelease.

As a rule of thumb, you need always to balance the retain count for objects to avoid memory leaks.

So, as a methaphor you could think to memory like a tree. Suppose you have a parent (containerColor) and a child (currentColor). If the parent (with a retain of count of 1) is released, it causes to call its dealloc method and free memory for its object. If in its dealloc method you release a child (with a retain count of 1) it causes to call its dealloc method and free memory. In the case a child has a retain count greater than one, you cause a memory leak.

Hope it helps.

Edit

For further information you could read About Memory Management. Since iOS 5 Apple has introduced ARC. Automatic Reference Counting is a compiler machanism that provides automatic memory management of Objective-C objects. For info see Transitioning to ARC Release Notes.

share|improve this answer
    
Hello Flex, Thank you very much for your answer. –  karthick Jan 26 '12 at 3:59
    
You're welcome! –  flexaddicted Jan 26 '12 at 9:05

When you use retain setter for currentColor property you retain that object, and if you retain , copy or alloc memory for a object you MUST RELEASE IT. -(void)dealloc is the best place to do it

share|improve this answer

You should only call release on the object if you allocated it (via alloc, copy or retain). Properties with the retain attribute will automatically do the memory management for you as long as you handle them properly, e.g. only access them via self.currentColor. Depending on how you created the color object you might or might not use release but you always should set the property to nil in your dealloc method. Two examples:

// If you use this (or some other way to get the color without alloc, copy or retain)
// then you do not need to do any release
self.currentColor = UIColor.blackColor;
self.currentColor = [UIColor colorWithRed:1.0 green:0.5 blue:0.2 alpha:1.0];

// On the other hand if you get it like this, you have to release/autorelease the object
self.currentColor = [[UIColor alloc] initWithRed:1.0 green:0.5 blue:0.2 alpha:1.0];
[self.currentColor release];
// or better
self.currentColor = [[[UIColor alloc] initWithRed:1.0 green:0.5 blue:0.2 alpha:1.0] autorelease];

// dealloc always the same
-(void)dealloc{
    [currentColor release], currentColor = nil;
    [super dealloc];
}

There are two important facts here:

  1. For each alloc, copy or retain that your code issues, you have to issue release or autorelease.

  2. Always use self.currentColor to access the property and not currentColor except when deallocating. The thing here is that when using self.currentColor the system automatically adds memory management code. Whenever self.currentColor is set, it automatically retains and releases the objects. Only on final deallocation you should set the variable directly, for more information see this answer on the topic (thanks to Flex_Addicted).

share|improve this answer
    
Calling self.currentColor = nil; in dealloc method could create problems as suggested in release-or-set-to-nil-retained-members and in MemoryMgmt Apple doc –  flexaddicted Jan 21 '12 at 12:11
    
Thanks, quite an interesting thought. I'll edit my post accordingly. –  Dennis Bliefernicht Jan 21 '12 at 12:17
    
You're welcome. –  flexaddicted Jan 21 '12 at 12:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.