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Hai is it possible to check the broadcast receiver is currently running or not?if possible how to check it?

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what are you trying to do , why or where do you want to check if its running or not –  confucius Jan 21 '12 at 13:38
am checking for getting latitude value,i create a application using broadcast receiver in login form.whenevr i entered the form my receiver is automatically started.But i need to start once –  Mercy Jan 21 '12 at 13:42
A BroadcastReceiver isn't meant to run permanently. Either register a BroadcastReceiver in the manifest allowing it to receive various Intents or register/unregister dynamically in your code. If you want to know when (if) it gets triggered then simply use a Log method to track it in logcat. –  Squonk Jan 21 '12 at 13:49
This is dependent on how you want it to work? When do you register it? When do you unregister it? –  JoxTraex Jan 21 '12 at 13:50
@MisterSquonk i registered dynamically only –  Mercy Jan 21 '12 at 13:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want to check it at runtime you can store a global boolean variable and set it to false and inside your onReceive() set it to true and before the onReceive() exit set it back to false . any time you can check this global variable to tell if that broadcast receiver is running or not .

if you mean you want to know if its work or not make a message to the log cat example

     Log.d("my broadcast","works");
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You can use dumpsys to help debug this for dynamically registered receivers:

adb shell dumpsys activity broadcasts

Use this in combination with grep and breakpoints in the debugger and you can find if your broadcast is registered at a certain time or not.

This is supposed to help with statically registered receivers, but I haven't used it myself:

adb shell dumpsys package

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A BroadcastReceiver is not intended to be running in the background. It'll be woken up and killed in limited scope.

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