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So I'm trying to create a matrix-like program with "raining green code". Everything has been going well until I decided to throw all of the string instances into a list and draw/update from it. In order to acheive the proper effect I need to randomize a few things.

All the strings are created and stored in the list you see here in a for loop. The interval and dropspeed random numbers change how fast a string falls, and at what speed the individual characters rotate through a sprite sheet.

For some reason though I'm just getting a wall of text that falls all at once and all the sprites are rotating at an equal pace. The classes and their respective functions do work...so the question is what am I doing wrong with my random number initialization?

for (int i = 0; i < (wWidth / 30); i++)
{
    Random random = new Random(new System.DateTime().Millisecond);
    float randInterval = NextFloat(random);
    int dropSpeed = random.Next(1, 7);
    _msList.Add(new MatrixString(chinese, randInterval, dropSpeed, dropSpeed, 1.0f, xOff, 10));
    xOff = i * 32;
}
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6  
You need to create your random instance outside of your for loop. – Dave M Jan 21 '12 at 13:57
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You need to create the random instance outside the for loop:

Random random = new Random(new System.DateTime().Millisecond);
for (int i = 0; i < (wWidth / 30); i++)
{
    float randInterval = NextFloat(random);
    int dropSpeed = random.Next(1, 7);
    _msList.Add(new MatrixString(  
                chinese, randInterval, dropSpeed, dropSpeed, 1.0f, xOff, 10));
    xOff = i * 32;
}

Within a short running loop, seeding with new System.DateTime().Millisecond will create the same seed value. Hence, the same random number.

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1  
It could also be noted that the parameterless constructor of Random uses the system time as a seed, so creating a new DateTime to pass in probably isn't needed (just do new Random()). – George Duckett Jan 21 '12 at 14:22
    
I could've SWORN I tried this...it does work thank you guys. – Mike Hometchko Jan 21 '12 at 14:24
    
Don't worry it's a fairly common mistake, on my last game project almost every scripter on the design team was reseeding their random number generator each time they needed a random number. And to make things worse the Time() method they were using was broken so the seed was always the same. It was an MMO and they didn't notice it was broken because the servers ran for days, so by the time someone logged in it had been running long enough that it was unnoticeable, except in the cases that were reseeding every time. Anyway, I am rambling now. – Nic Foster Jan 21 '12 at 22:12

Your loop is "to fast" and so the new Random(new System.DateTime().Millisecond) will always deliver the same result as each loop is faster then 1ms - the following should work:

Random random = new Random(new System.DateTime().Millisecond);
for (int i = 0; i < (wWidth / 30); i++)
{
    float randInterval = NextFloat(random);
    int dropSpeed = random.Next(1, 7);
    _msList.Add(new MatrixString(chinese, randInterval, dropSpeed, dropSpeed, 1.0f, xOff, 10));
    xOff = i * 32;
}
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