Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to do an algorithm that search a specific int in array of int. That number must appear >= than arraySize/2 times.

example: [] = 4 4 3 5 5 5 5 5 5 6 arraysize: 10 number 5 exists 6x -> so this is the result of algorithm

but I need to do this without additionam memory, and in time O(n) -> in one pass.

Is this even possible? Any suggestions how to start it?

share|improve this question
2  
Will you know which number to check for in advance, or do you need to check whether any number occupies half or more of the array? –  Douglas Jan 21 '12 at 14:12
1  
possible duplicate of Linear time majority algorithm? –  templatetypedef Jan 21 '12 at 21:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It is indeed possible; the task is known as "Dominant Element," and used for interviews and as a homework. Read the article below for a proper analysis; the solution itself is simple but not easy: proving that it indeed does what it promises is not quite trivial (unless of course you know the answer).

http://www.cse.iitk.ac.in/users/sbaswana/Courses/ESO211/problem.pdf

element x;
int count ← 0;
For(i = 0 to n − 1)
{
    if(count == 0) { x ← A[i]; count ++; }
    else if (A[i] == x) count ++;
    else count −−
}
Check if x is dominant element by scanning array A.

Note though that the time is O(n), but as far as I'm aware, it is not possible to do it in one pass unless you know for sure there is a dominant element.

As of additional memory, you will need memory for i, the counter; x, the element to check and return; and count, the size of the imaginary working set. That's O(1) and is usually considered OK for such problems.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yep, the "trick" is in how the question is phrased. For a positive answer there must be an element that is present more than 50% of the time. Simply finding the most "popular" (but possibly not majority) element is an O(N**2) problem, unless additional storage is used. –  Hot Licks Jan 21 '12 at 14:32
    
Yep. If there is a majority element, that's the one you end up with, but if there isn't, x still has some value after the first loop, so you need to check. I disagree with 'proving ... far from being trivial', though. Given the algorithm, it's rather straightforward to prove its correctness. Coming up with the algorithm on the other hand ... –  Daniel Fischer Jan 21 '12 at 14:33
    
@DanielFischer I'm apparently not smart enough to prove its correctness—the idea of a working set modeled by an element and its count is not expressed in the code; without understanding this idea, it's not clear at all. Not to me, at least. –  alf Jan 21 '12 at 14:35
    
Work with an implicit second counter. Let m be the majority element, n[i] = (number of occurrences of m in A[0] to A[i]) - (number of occurrences of other elements there). By induction, it's easy to see that count[i] >= n[i] for all i and element == m whenever n[i] > 0. Since n[length-1] > 0 is assumed, it follows that the algorithm ends with the majority element if there is one. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 21 '12 at 14:45
    
@DanielFischer the element == m whenever n[i] > 0 part evades me. How do we prove the induction step here? For i, element == m if n[i] > 0. For i+1, we don't know n[i+1], and we don't know n[i]. The wording might be not right, though. Let me fix. –  alf Jan 21 '12 at 18:23

Moore describes the solution to this problem on his web site (with an example here).

Edit: Here is some Java code demonstrating the algorithm as described:

public class Majority 
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        int[]a = new int[]{4, 4, 3, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 6};

        int count = 0;
        int candidateIndex = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < a.length; i++)
        {
            if (count == 0)
            {
                candidateIndex = i;
                count++;
            }
            else
            {
                if (a[i] == a[candidateIndex])
                    count++;
                else
                    count--;
            }
        }

        System.out.println("Majority element: " + a[candidateIndex]);
    }
}

After you get your candidateIndex, you can iterate though the array again to verify that it indeed occurs more than N / 2 times.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.