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I want to write a method, which takes a String and swaps each pair of characters in it and then concatenates them into a new String. Please let me know how to fix this code (or write a new better one):

    static String s;

    public static void proc(String w) {     
        ArrayList k = new ArrayList();
        ArrayList m = new ArrayList();
        System.out.println(w.length()); 
        int j = 0;
        //test arraylist to check if string is written into arraylist
        for (int i = 0; i < w.length(); i++){
            k.add(w.charAt(i));         
        }
        String p = k.get(2).toString();
        System.out.println(p);  

//here starts the logic of my app
        for (int n = 0; n < w.length(); n++){
            String v = k.get(n).toString();
            if (n == 0){
                m.add(1, v);
            }
            else if (n == 1){
                m.add(0, v);
            }
            else if ((n % 2) == 0){
                m.add(n+1, v);
            }
            else {
                m.add(n, v);
            }           
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args){
        s = "tests";
        proc(s);        
    }

Hi this is not a homework, but am doing exercises from a book. Anyway using code provided by Jon managed to work on my own - it may be not as much elegant but is doing the job using dynamic sizing as well:

public static void proc(String w) {     

        ArrayList k = new ArrayList();
        ArrayList g = new ArrayList();
        String h = "";

        for (int i = 0; i < w.length(); i++){   
            char temp = w.charAt(i);
            k.add(i, temp);
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < w.length(); i++){
            if (i == 0){
                h = k.get(1).toString();
                g.add(h);
            }
            else if (i == 1){
                h = k.get(0).toString();
                g.add(h);
            }
            else if ((i % 2) == 0){

                h = k.get(i+1).toString();

                g.add(h);
            }
            else if ((i % 2) == 1){
                h = k.get(i-1).toString();
                g.add(h);
            }
        }
        System.out.println(g.toString());
    }
    public static void main(String[] args){
        s = "test";
        proc(s);
    }
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1  
You don't use the solution or print it out. What do you think needs fixing? Can you provide examples of what you are trying to do? –  Peter Lawrey Jan 21 '12 at 14:25
    
I also failed to understand what he asked. –  SHiRKiT Jan 21 '12 at 14:26
    
Show us some examples of what you are trying to achieve. –  RanRag Jan 21 '12 at 14:27
    
I assume this is just an exercise. You can make the code much shorter and simpler. You would learn much more do trying to optimise the code yourself that me just giving you an answer. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 21 '12 at 14:30
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I haven't tried to go through exactly how your code is trying to work, but it looks unnecessarily complicated to me. Given that you don't need dynamic sizing, you can do this more easily with an array:

public static String swapPairs(String input) {
    char[] chars = input.toCharArray();
    for (int i = 0; i < chars.length - 1; i += 2) {
        char tmp = chars[i];
        chars[i] = chars[i + 1];
        chars[i + 1] = tmp;
    }
    return new String(chars);
}

Note that while this will work for "simple" characters (where each element of the array is independent of the rest), it doesn't try to take any form of "composite" characters into consideration, such as characters formed from two UTF-16 code units (surrogate pairs) or combined characters such as "e + acute accent". Doing this sort of contextually-aware swapping would take a lot more effort.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: That's freaky. If you saw the code I wrote to do the same thing.... (Only a couple of names changed ;) –  Peter Lawrey Jan 21 '12 at 14:33
    
@RanRag it will swap all the pairs and leave any lone character at the end. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 21 '12 at 14:34
    
@RanRag: It swaps (0, 1), (2, 3), (4, 5) etc. –  Jon Skeet Jan 21 '12 at 14:37
    
Sorry, my bad i tested it for hello.That's why i didn't see the swapping of l & l. –  RanRag Jan 21 '12 at 14:38
    
thank you that is something I was looking for, although I tried it with dynamic sizing since I didn't know how long would be the string, but this is even better. –  aretai Jan 21 '12 at 16:58
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This looks like homework, so I'll limit my answer to a couple of hints.

  1. I would accumulate the result in a StringBuilder (called sb in what follows).
  2. I would have a loop (for i = 0; i < w.length(); i += 2). In this loop I would do two things:
    • if i + 1 is within the bounds of the string, I'd append the i + 1-th character to sb;
    • append the i-th character to sb.
  3. At the end, call sb.toString().
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