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I mean, we all know that there is the negation logical operator !, and it can be used like this:

class Foo
{
public:
    bool operator!() { /* implementation */ }
};

int main()
{
    Foo f;
    if (!f)
        // Do Something
}

Is there any operator that allows this:

if (f)
    // Do Something

I know it might not be important, but just wondering!

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by defining the operator bool(), you get what you want. –  maress Jan 21 '12 at 18:00
    
@maress: Yes, we've covered that. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 21 '12 at 18:01
    
Possible duplicate of artima.com/cppsource/safebool.html –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 21 '12 at 18:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can declare and define operator bool() for implicit conversion to bool, if you're careful.

Or write:

if (!!f)
   // Do something
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I know I could do it this way, but is there no direct operator? –  Tamer Shlash Jan 21 '12 at 17:55
1  
@Mr.TAMER: How is operator bool() not direct? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 21 '12 at 17:55
1  
@Mr.TAMER: if requires its condition expression to be of bool type, so anything you give it will be converted to bool where possible. Same story for if (1) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 21 '12 at 18:01
1  
Got it, thanks :), but what did you mean by careful? what should I care more about? –  Tamer Shlash Jan 21 '12 at 18:02
1  
@Mr.TAMER: Google for "safe bool idiom". –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 21 '12 at 18:09
operator bool() { //implementation };
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Since operator bool() in itself is pretty dangerous, we usually employ something called the safe-bool idiom:

class X{
  typedef void (X::*safe_bool)() const;
  void safe_bool_true() const{}
  bool internal_test() const;
public:
  operator safe_bool() const{
    if(internal_test())
      return &X::safe_bool_true;
    return 0;
  }
};

In C++11, we get explicit conversion operators; as such, the above idiom is obsolete:

class X{
  bool internal_test() const;
public:
  explicit operator bool() const{
    return internal_test();
  }
};
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