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I normally work on projects alone.

When I start a project, I make very good progress quickly. But when I realise that I have got some success, the projects starts becoming bigger in my mind. The pictures of success, of things after release start cluttering my mind and then I find it very difficult to work anymore. I find myself procastinating. Finishing the project becomes a really tough job. Many times things stop just before the finishing line.

Do you face this problem? What is your strategy for finishing what you have started?

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12 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Check The Cult of Done Manifesto. It really works for me.

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Wow! Awesome link!! –  Aaron May 21 '09 at 23:38
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I have this problem all the time.

I usually solve this by breaking down the problem into independent smaller ones. If I just tell myself "I'm going to finish the program," I'll never finish it. If I concentrate on just one area at a time, and design the program so that each part is useful on its own and independent from the others, I am much more productive.

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One thing that really helps is to focus on finishing what's on your plate before starting new features. Make sure all the bugs are fixed and the things you're concentrating on are fully implemented before moving on, or you tend to end up with a big project with a million hard tasks left to do.

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My strategy is that I pick one project that I want to move forward, and I work on that project for 45–90 minutes every day. Or if time is really tight, at least 30 minutes. But never more than 90.

I got this strategy from the strangest place: Advice for New Faculty Members by Bob Boice. Boice spent 20 years studying what makes faculty members successful, and one of the big predictors is working in brief, daily sessions. People who do this are roughly twice as productive on quantitative measures of productivity, and they report being more satisfied with their jobs. It runs counter to the established mythology of our field (many people think that to get anything done, you must have marathon coding sessions), but this technique has utterly changed my professional life.

Boice goes to great lengths on how to implement this strategy. For me the most difficult part has been to stop after a brief session—when I'm on a roll, I want to continue. But the brief daily sessions really work. You'd think the interruption and downtime would get in your way, and that the start it does, but Boice's studies show that for almost everyone, after two or three weeks of brief daily sessions your startup cost for a new session is nearly zero. My own experience confirms this (and I am lucky enough to be one of the two-week people).

I cannot recommend this method too highly.

(If you want to know what I do with the rest of my time, I meet with people, lecture, respond to email, and answer questions on SO.)

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Deadlines and Satisfaction in Completing a Project are usually my motivation.

Generally annoying in-house-customers and nosy management are actually deterrents.

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Happens all the time.

I have to mentally encourage myself to finish what I'm working on every morning. Sometimes I'll switch from project to project to keep things fresh. I'll also visit sites like this to help reinvigorate my desire for my craft.

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The determination to see things through to their completion and not get side-tracked.

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In addition to a knack for organizing and keeping track of things. –  Cuga May 21 '09 at 22:27
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Make yourself accountable in some way.

Tell your friends or if you're really brave announce it on some website related to your project.

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Counterpoint: newsweek.com/id/197006 Summary: Announcing your goals may not necessarily help you get them accomplished. In fact, sometimes it does just the opposite. –  Runcible May 21 '09 at 22:39
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@Runcible: yeah, it happens to me all the time. as soon as i announce something, it seems to be the wrong idea after all. –  Javier May 21 '09 at 22:55
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Agree. Announcing planned features or stuff that you are currently working on.. for me it has had exactly the opposite effect. It causes a pressure, and im not good at dealing with it. So I have stopped doing it. Also uploading a project to sourceforge before its mature.. is also a way I have killed a few of my projects, so wait until you are ready. –  neoneye May 21 '09 at 23:30
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Many times I have had this issue. Generally the way this gets resolved is the question of whether or not the person paying for my skills wants to keep giving me money to fix what may be cosmetic bugs and/or discover problems rather than letting me start on something else that is more worthy of my time and attention.

It can also help to have a different idea of why something is called done:

  • Hard deadline - As in there is this trial starting on date x and you have to be done before that.
  • No high priority bugs remain - Some places may not want to devote resources to bugs with a priority of level 3-5.
  • Customer is happy with current result - This is rather rare but sometimes it happens. The ability to leave well enough alone can be useful here.
  • Other projects are now higher priority - Kind of like the second choice but the idea here is that if noone is working on a project, isn't it done?

It also helps to avoid thinking like a perfectionist and wanting ideal software rather than real world software.

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You need to set a deadline and then meet the deadline, regardless of whether all the 'required' features are implemented or not. If you are continually checking in code that is usable, then this shouldn't be a problem.

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Eliminate all TODO's before you move on to other tasks. Looking at a zillion TODO's is not motivating. Knowing that your project is healty helps a lot on motivation to finishing it.

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It happens to me too. Working with more people, at least 1 helps. Also I keep myself motivated trying to do things in new ways or improving something on the program. But this is totally true, the last mille is the hardest one.

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