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Can someone suggest what would be the best practice or a suitable library to determine:

  1. Number of CPU cycles used during execution of a Python function?
  2. Amount of Memory used by the same Python function?

I had looked at guppy and meliae, but still can't get granular to the function level? Am I missing something?

UPDATE The need for asking this question is to solve a specific situation which is, the scenario is that we have a set of distributed tasks running on cloud instances, and now we need to reorganize the placement of tasks on right instance types withing the cluster, for example high memory consuming functional tasks would be placed on larger memory instances and so on. When I mean tasks (celery-tasks), these are nothing but plain functions for which we need to now profile their execution usage.

Thanks.

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10  
If you need to worry about these things so precisely then Python isn't the language for you. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jan 21 '12 at 20:15
2  
"Am I missing something ?" Yes. You're missing the fact that Python rests on one of many implementations: CPython, Jython, PyPy, each of which is different. Most implementations directly or indirectly rest on GNU C libraries which vary from release to release. It's going to be very, very hard to measure CPU cycles because there are so many layers of software involved. What are you trying to learn? What do you need to know? What decision are you trying to make? –  S.Lott Jan 21 '12 at 20:21
    
as @S.Lott said, It will be hard to determine the CPU cycles of the EXACT function since even if you can measure it, the results wont be accurate. –  user779444 Jan 21 '12 at 20:27
    
@S.Lott I do understand the complexity, the scenario is that we have a set of distributed tasks running on cloud instances, and now we need to reorganize the placement of tasks on right instance type, for example high memory consuming functional tasks would be placed on larger memory instances and so on. Hope this explains the need for quest. Thanks. –  Zakiullah Khan Mohamed Jan 21 '12 at 21:03
3  
@MohammedKhan: Please explain your actual problem in the question. Not in a comment. Please update the question to explain what you're goal is so that we can help. –  S.Lott Jan 21 '12 at 21:04
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2 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You may want to look into a CPU profiler for Python:
http://docs.python.org/library/profile.html
Example output of cProfile.run(command[, filename])

  2706 function calls (2004 primitive calls) in 4.504 CPU seconds

Ordered by: standard name

ncalls  tottime  percall  cumtime  percall filename:lineno(function)
     2    0.006    0.003    0.953    0.477 pobject.py:75(save_objects)
  43/3    0.533    0.012    0.749    0.250 pobject.py:99(evaluate)
...

Also, memory needs a profiler too:
open source profilers: PySizer and Heapy

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Thanks @Ayoubi for the above pointer, it surely does help a bit. Thanks again. –  Zakiullah Khan Mohamed Jan 22 '12 at 8:19
    
@ayoubi: This displays the execution time, but what about the CPU cycles(CPU utilization), Memory (memory usage) ? –  shiva krishna Nov 22 '12 at 11:45
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maybe this will help http://pypi.python.org/pypi/psutil

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4  
no really. That's about processes, not functions. –  Johan Lundberg Jan 21 '12 at 20:38
    
@oleg I had evaluated already psutil as Johan says its a query interface to determine the system level stats and not for python run time functions. –  Zakiullah Khan Mohamed Jan 21 '12 at 21:14
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