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I would have a string that is parsed into an array, as shown here:

class Example extends ParentClass {
    private String[] array;

    public static Example parseString(String lineToParse) {
        array = lineToParse.split("\");
    }

    public ObjectType1() { // arguments: String, String, String
    }

    public ObjectType2() { // arguments: String, String, String, double, double
    }
}

What I'm wondering is could I do this?

if (array[0].equals("Test")) {
     public ObjectType1()
}

Or is there a better way to do this?

I want to create various objects with different arguments each, and the first argument (array[0]) will be applicable to each object, so I was wondering if I could create objects within an if statement like this, or a switch (not sure if that would work either).

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An object doesn't have arguments. A method has arguments. I don't understand what you want to do. Please explain with a concrete example. –  JB Nizet Jan 21 '12 at 20:24
    
Do you mean an object or a method/void? –  anorton Jan 21 '12 at 20:24
    
It's not clear if you want to define constructors or methods. Anyway, if you paste your code in any editor and try to compile it, you'll have an idea of what's wrong :) –  Savino Sguera Jan 21 '12 at 20:28
1  
I did mean an object. :) –  user1162715 Jan 21 '12 at 21:02
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4 Answers

I believe a factory method would be useful for you, one that returns instances of classes according to the parameter received:

// ObjectType1, ObjectType2, ObjectType3 inherit from ObjectType
static ObjectType getInstance(String[] array) {
    if (array[0].equals("Test"))
        return new ObjectType1(array);
    else if (array[0].equals("Test2"))
        return new ObjectType2(array);
    else
        return new ObjectType3(array);
}

For the record, actually you can define a class inside a method, this is valid code in Java ... of course, that's hardly a good thing to do:

// ObjectType1, ObjectType2 inherit from ObjectType
public ObjectType example(String[] array) {
    if (array[0].equals("Test")) {
        class ObjectType1 {
            ObjectType1(String[] array) {
            }
        }
        return new ObjectType1(array);
    }
    else {
        class ObjectType2 {
            ObjectType2(String[] array) {
            }
        }
        return new ObjectType2(array);
    }
}
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"Creating" an object means "instantiating it", with new:

ObjectType1 foo = new ObjectType1(...);

You can do that anywhere it's legal to instantiate a class, including in an if statement.

You cannot define classes in arbitrary locations, however.

If you just want to call a method (which should start with a lower-case letter if you want Java developers to understand what you're trying to do), you can call it from anywhere, including inside if statements.

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This sounds like you may want to use a [static factory method][1].

[1]: http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Factory_method_pattern
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Sorry, no link button on mobile, and I can't remember the syntax! –  Jonathon Reinhart Jan 21 '12 at 20:38
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I guess that you want to dynamically create objects based on a configuration file?

There are lots of ways to achieve this. One simple way is to use reflection to create the objects. Then you do not need any if/switch statements, and if you want to create a new type of object your code does not need to be changed.

Here are some examples for using reflection: Reflection API Code Samples

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Come on. The OP doesn't understand the basics of the language yet: classes, objects, methods. And you want to make him use reflection? –  JB Nizet Jan 21 '12 at 20:45
    
I was not sure if the code sample was just "pseudo code" ;-) But probably you are right and then reflection is too advanced :) –  user1078445 Jan 21 '12 at 20:50
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