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How do I make this into a grayscale?

After much googling it seems the best I can do is change the tint of the picture (in the code bellow, it's a green tint). How can I do it?

byte[] redGreenBlueVal = new byte[numBytes];

for (int i = 0; i < redGreenBlueVal .Length; i += 4)
{
    redGreenBlueVal [i + 0] = (byte)(.114 * redGreenBlueVal [i + 0]); --> blue
    redGreenBlueVal [i + 1] = (byte)(.587 * redGreenBlueVal [i + 1]); --> green
    redGreenBlueVal [i + 2] = (byte)(.299 * redGreenBlueVal [i + 2]); --> red
}
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possible duplicate of parallel openmp c# –  Hans Passant Jan 21 '12 at 20:41
1  
Don't be surprised when you receive an OutOfBounds exceptions. –  Ash Burlaczenko Jan 21 '12 at 20:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In effect you're adjusting HSB so this should get you a better grayscale image: 30% RED 59% GREEN 11% BLUE

byte[] redGreenBlueVal = new byte[numBytes];

for (int i = 0; i < redGreenBlueVal .Length; i += 4)
{
      gray = (byte)(.11 * redGreenBlueVal [i + 0]);
      gray += (byte)(.59 * redGreenBlueVal [i + 1]); 
      gray += (byte)(.3 * redGreenBlueVal [i + 2]);

      redGreenBlueVal [i + 0] = gray;
      redGreenBlueVal [i + 1] = gray;
      redGreenBlueVal [i + 2] = gray;

}
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Sorry? This is exactly what i have in my code... –  BigBug Jan 21 '12 at 20:44
    
I copied my code wrong. sorry, just edited (I'm taking this from an iOS app I wrote in Objective C so I didn't define 'gray' variable for you...) –  John Carter Jan 21 '12 at 20:45
    
Can you show some documentation? I can't see that being right. E.g 255,255,255 [WHITE] would become 76.5, 150.45, 28.05 [NOT WHITE]. –  Ash Burlaczenko Jan 21 '12 at 20:47
    
Ok thanks, and i'm assuming gray is a byte? i'll try that.. –  BigBug Jan 21 '12 at 20:48
    
Yes, thanks :) this is what i was looking for –  BigBug Jan 21 '12 at 20:49

You could try setting each pixels colour channels to the average value for that pixel.

i.e.

for( int i = 0; i < redGreenBlueVal.Length; += 4 )
{
    int average = (redGreenBlueVal[i + 0] + redGreenBlueVal[i + 1] + redGreenBlueVal[i + 2])/3;
    redGreenBlueVal[i + 0] = average;
    redGreenBlueVal[i + 1] = average;
    redGreenBlueVal[i + 2] = average;
}
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this doesn't work so I'm wondering how it got up votes –  John Carter Jan 21 '12 at 20:56
    
I think it doesn't work because redGreenBlueVal is a byte, and you get overflow. You should probably convert to int before calculating the average. –  Tibi Jan 21 '12 at 21:00
1  
I'm sorry but it seems obvious this can't work. (RGB)0,0,255 and (RGB)255,0,0 and (RGB)0,255,0 would all three become the same gray color which certainly isn't correct. You need to look at HSB/RGB calculations to understand that averages affect brightness and will not work –  John Carter Jan 21 '12 at 22:07

To get a grayscale image, the basic idea is to have all the 3 channels hold the same value. There are many ways to do this, the simplest ones are:

  • use only one of the channels (it will look like when you select individual channels in photoshop)
  • calculate an average of the 3 channels
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