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If I have an array of hashes, each with a day key:

[
    {:day=>4,:name=>'Jay'},
    {:day=>1,:name=>'Ben'},
    {:day=>4,:name=>'Jill'}
]

What is the best way to convert it to a hash with sorted day values as the keys:

{
    :1=>[{:day=>1,:name=>'Ben'}],
    :4=>[{:day=>4,:name=>'Jay'},{:day=>4,:name=>'Jill'}]
}

I'm using Ruby 1.9.2 and Rails 3.1.1

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Hashes by nature are not sorted. Ruby 1.9+ maintains the insertion order, so if you create a hash and insert elements based on some sort order, Ruby will maintain those. However, any subsequent elements will not be sorted, and will be appended instead. If you need to retrieve them in a certain order, you can sort the keys prior to retrieving the values, or you can maintain an array of the keys in parallel to the hash, and keep that array in the order that you want, then iterate that array, or use it with values_at to retrieve the values in the order you want. –  the Tin Man Jan 22 '12 at 4:52
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Personally, I wouldn't bother "sorting" the keys (which amounts to ordering-by-entry-time in Ruby 1.9) until I actually needed to. Then you can use group_by:

arr = [{:day=>4,:name=>'Jay'}, {:day=>1,:name=>'Ben'}, {:day=>4,:name=>'Jill'}]
arr.group_by { |a| a[:day] }
=> {4=>[{:day=>4, :name=>"Jay"}, {:day=>4, :name=>"Jill"}],
    1=>[{:day=>1, :name=>"Ben"}]}

Instead, sort the keys when you actually need them.

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+1 this is awesome. –  Anurag Jan 21 '12 at 21:59
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Assuming you array is called is list, here's one way using the reduce method:

list.reduce({}) { |hash, item|
  (hash[item[:day]] ||= []) << item; hash
}

Here's another using the map method, but you have to carry a holder variable around:

hash = {}
list.each { |item|
  (hash[item[:day]] ||= []) << item
}

Once you have the unsorted hash say in variable foo, you can sort it as,

Hash[foo.sort]
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You should never use map if you are going to discard result. Use each instead! –  Victor Moroz Jan 21 '12 at 23:12
    
@VictorMoroz - thanks for pointing that out. I've added the change. –  Anurag Jan 22 '12 at 0:16
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Simple answer:

data = [
    {:day=>4,:name=>'Jay'},
    {:day=>1,:name=>'Ben'},
    {:day=>4,:name=>'Jill'}
]

#expected solution
sol = {
    1=>[{:day=>1,:name=>'Ben'}],
    4=>[{:day=>4,:name=>'Jay'},{:day=>4,:name=>'Jill'}]
}

res = {}
data.each{|h|
  res[h[:day]] ||=  [] 
  res[h[:day]] << h
}

p res
p res == sol    #check value
p res.keys == sol.keys  #check order

Problem with this solution: The hash is not sorted as requested. (Same problem has Anurags solution).

So you must modify the answer a bit:

res = {}
data.sort_by{|h| h[:day]}.each{|h|
  res[h[:day]] ||=  [] 
  res[h[:day]] << h
}

p res
p res == sol    #check value
p res.keys == sol.keys  #check order
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In Rails you can use OrderedHash:

ActiveSupport::OrderedHash[arr.group_by { |a| a[:day] }.sort_by(&:first)]

Update: In fact in Ruby 1.9 hash is ordered, so using ActiveSupport extension is not required:

Hash[arr.group_by { |a| a[:day] }.sort_by(&:first)]
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