Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Difference of two pointers of the same type is always one.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>
int main(){
int a = 5,b = 10,c;
int *p = &a,*q = &b;
c = p - q;
printf("%d" , c);
return 0;
}

Output is 1.

I dont get the reasoning behind it

share|improve this question
4  
This program exhibits undefined behavior. You can only perform pointer arithmetic on two pointers if they both point to elements of the same array or to subobjects of the same class type. –  James McNellis Jan 21 '12 at 21:54
1  
Also, pointer arithmetic is done in units of the pointer type, not bytes. –  nos Jan 21 '12 at 21:55
1  
No. What do you expect the subtraction of those pointers to do ? –  nos Jan 21 '12 at 21:57
1  
I thought the subtraction of pointers will give difference between 2 addresses. And the difference can vary.It can be 4 if they are allocated contigously.It can b 8,12 etc in multiples of 4. Is my reasoning wrong? –  Anusha Pachunuri Jan 21 '12 at 22:17
1  
@Anusha Pachunuri Somewhat. As others mention, you should not subtract pointers to different variables, as that yields undefined behavior. Also, pointer aritmetic are done in the units of the pointer type, so 1 means "1 int", if you want bytes, you need 1*sizeof(int) (which might be 4). The variable might not be stored in memory, it might reside in a register, however your code taking the address of the variable could force it to reside in memory. And just because the C code declares the a variable first, doesn't mean it resides before b in memory. –  nos Jan 21 '12 at 22:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The behavior is undefined.

C99 6.5.6 paragraph 9 says:

When two pointers are subtracted, both shall point to elements of the same array object, or one past the last element of the array object; the result is the difference of the subscripts of the two array elements.

Paragraph 7 in the same section says:

For the purposes of these operators, a pointer to an object that is not an element of an array behaves the same as a pointer to the first element of an array of length one with the type of the object as its element type.

Section 4 paragraph 2 says:

If a "shall" or "shall not" requirement that appears outside of a constraint is violated, the behavior is undefined. Undefined behavior is otherwise indicated in this International Standard by the words "undefined behavior" or by the omission of any explicit definition of behavior. There is no difference in emphasis among these three; they all describe "behavior that is undefined".

3.4.3 defines the term "undefined behavior" as:

behavior, upon use of a nonportable or erroneous program construct or of erroneous data, for which this International imposes no requirements

NOTE Possible undefined behavior ranges from ignoring the situation completely with unpredictable results, to behaving during translation or program execution in a documented manner characteristic of the environment (with or without the issuance of a diagnostic message), to terminating a translation or execution (with the issuance of a diagnostic message).

Given the declaration:

int a = 5, b = 10, c;

it's likely that evaluating &b - &a will yield a result that seems reasonable, such as 1 or -1. (Reasonable results are always a possible symptom of undefined behavior; it's undefined, not required to crash.) But the compiler is under no obligation to place a and b at any particular locations in memory relative to each other, and even if it does so, the subtraction is not guaranteed to be meaningful. An optimizing compiler is free to transform your program in ways that assume that its behavior is well defined, resulting in code that can behave in arbitrarily bad ways if that assumption is violated.

By writing &b - &a, you are in effect promising the compiler that that's a meaningful operation. As Henry Spencer famously said, "If you lie to the compiler, it will get is revenge."

Note that it's not just the result of the subtraction that's undefined, it's the behavior of the program that evaluates it.


Oh, did I mention that the behavior is undefined?

share|improve this answer
    
Yupp. Got it.Thanks for the detailed axplanation –  Anusha Pachunuri Jan 21 '12 at 22:43

In fact, the behaviour of your program is undefined. The output happens to be 1 on your platform/compiler, but it could just as easily be something else.

share|improve this answer
    
Is it really undefined behavior (in the standard sense) or is the result itself undefined? –  Luchian Grigore Jan 21 '12 at 22:00
1  
@LuchianGrigore: I am not sure I understand the distinction between the two possibilities. –  NPE Jan 21 '12 at 22:01
1  
Well by undefined behavior (from a standard perspective), I understand that anything can happen. Here, all that can happen is that you get different values depending on compiler or even run. Am I wrong? –  Luchian Grigore Jan 21 '12 at 22:04
    
I'm not trying to discredit your answer btw, I just thought that substracting two pointers is legal. Is it not? Is that part the UB? Is there a standard spec about this? –  Luchian Grigore Jan 21 '12 at 22:09
    
@LuchianGrigore: The behavior is undefined. You can only perform arithmetic using two pointers if both pointers point to elements of the same array or to subobjects of the same object (e.g., members of the same struct). –  James McNellis Jan 21 '12 at 22:21

This code exhibits undefined behaviour because pointer arithmetic is only defined when the operands are both in the same array or struct.

The value of 1 comes about because the compiler has placed a and b next to each other in memory. Another compiler could do something different. Indeed the same compiler could do something different the next time you change the code.

share|improve this answer
    
Is it really undefined behavior (in the standard sense) or is the result itself undefined? –  Luchian Grigore Jan 21 '12 at 22:00
1  
Well by undefined behavior (from a standard perspective), I understand that anything can happen. Here, all that can happen is that you get different values depending on compiler or even run. Am I wrong? –  Luchian Grigore Jan 21 '12 at 22:04
1  
Which part of the program is undefined behavior? Is it UB to substract 2 pointers? Or what? –  Luchian Grigore Jan 21 '12 at 22:06
    
James' comment doesn't have a reference to the standard. I'm not saying it's not true. –  Luchian Grigore Jan 21 '12 at 22:12
1  
Also, the standard doesn't specify what rand() returns, that doesn't mean it's undefined behavior :) –  Luchian Grigore Jan 21 '12 at 22:12

C compiler knows the size of each type. for example suppose P is a int pointer that refer to address 0x0010. if you add P by 1 (P++ or P=P+1), then the value of P is 0x0014.

About your question, a and b variables declared tandems, in physical memory they tandems, and the head of each of them, has 4 bytes difference with other. At this situation compiler knows the int size is 4 bytes. when you subtract 2 int pointer, the compiler divide the result by 4.

share|improve this answer
1  
Whats with dividing the result by 4? –  Anusha Pachunuri Jan 21 '12 at 22:15
2  
@anusha read nos's comment but this answer doesn't address the issue of undefined behaviour –  David Heffernan Jan 21 '12 at 22:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.