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I have what is essentially the following in python:

class X(object): pass

class Y(object):
  @classmethod
  def method(cls, x_inst, *args, **kwargs):
    #do some work here that requires an instance of x
    pass

What I would like to do is add a dynamic property to all instances of X allowing acces to Y that implicitly fills in the first parameter of the method with the given instance. E.G I would like the following code to work identically:

# current
x = X()
result = Y.method(x, 1, 2, 3)

# desired
x = X()
x.Y.method(1, 2, 3)

There are several methods on several subclasses that I would like to implement this behaviour for. What I have done currently is to create a YProxy class that X actually returns, and then put split some of the code into that. It seems rather inelegant and hard to maintain however:

class X(object):
  @property
  def Y(self):
    return YProxy(self)

class Y(object):
  @classmethod
  def method(cls, x_inst, *args, **kwargs):
    #do some work here that requires an instance of x
    pass

class YProxy(object):
  def __init__(self, x_inst):
    self.x_inst = x_inst

  def method(self, *args, **kwargs):
    return Y.method(self.x_inst, *args, **kwargs)

Is there any way to conditionally partially evaluate the classmethods on an object?

share|improve this question
    
In x().Y.foo, will foo always be a classmethod of Y that has to have its first argument filled in? Or do you want to be able to access arbitrary attributes of Y from instances of X? –  ben w Jan 21 '12 at 22:54
    
@benw there will be methods on Y that should not have x_inst as there first parameter, though currently those are all instance methods, not class methods. –  dave mankoff Jan 21 '12 at 22:59

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It can be done with a Descriptor object + a wrapper class ad explicitly declaring the classes you need to wrap on this way on your target class.

A descriptor object is any object defining a __get__ method, which allows one to customize the attribute retrieving when the descriptor is part of a class. On this case, we want that when that attribute - which is the "Y" class - is retrieved from an instance, whenever a method is retrieved from that class, the instance is inserted on the parameter list.

This requires that the attribute retrieved be itself a "proxy" class with custom attribute access to allow the dynamic wrapping to take note.

Translating all this into Python, we have:

import types
from functools import partial

class APIWrapper(object):
    def __init__(self, apicls, instance):
        self._apicls = apicls
        self._instance = instance
    def __getattribute__(self, attr):
        apicls = object.__getattribute__(self, "_apicls")
        instance = object.__getattribute__(self,"_instance")
        obj = getattr(apicls, attr)
        if isinstance(obj, types.MethodType):
            return partial(obj,instance)
        return obj


class APIProperty(object):
    def __init__(self, cls):
        self.cls = cls
    def __get__(self, instance, cls):
        return APIWrapper(self.cls, instance)

class Y(object):
    @classmethod
    def method(cls, x, *args):
        print cls, x, args

class X(object):
    Y = APIProperty(Y)

#Example usage: 
x = X()
x.Y.method(1,2,3)

(prints <class '__main__.Y'> <__main__.X object at 0x18ad090> (1, 2, 3) when run)

But I suppose you don't want to need to write

Y = APIWrapper(Y) 

for each of the classes you want to wrap on this way. (And have those classes defined after the wrapped class so that Y already has been parsed when X body is parsed).

This can be done with metaclasses, class decorators, which would have to be defined for each class you'd want to apply the methods - instead, I made a function that is to be called at the end of the module definition, where you define your "X" class - this function will add the desired classes as attributes for each class defined (in my example, I want the class to be marked with an "auto_api" attribute - but suit yourself) - Thus, the "auto_api" function, the definition of the X and Y classes becomes like this (using the same APIProperty and APIWrapper as above)

def auto_api(api_classes, glob_dict):
    for key, value in glob_dict.items():
        if isinstance(value, type) and hasattr(value, "auto_api"):
            for api_class in api_classes:
                setattr(value, api_class.__name__, APIProperty(api_class))


class X(object):
    auto_api = True

class Y(object):
    @classmethod
    def method(cls, x, *args):
        print cls, x, args

auto_api((Y,), globals())

#Example

x = X()
x.Y.method(1,2,3)
share|improve this answer
    
The __get__ method! Brilliant, I had forgotten about that. This did it for me. It's fine to declare all the potential class properties up front. There's a predefined set of them and there aren't many. I suppose if I really wanted, I could do some introspection of my module via a metaclass, but that will require more code than I'd be saving and would look awfully magical. –  dave mankoff Jan 22 '12 at 1:54
    
Reading the other answers now, @ben-w 's solution is very similar to this - but here I go a step further in which I allow you to pass the classes you want to wrap as parameters, instead of having to hardcode each one. –  jsbueno Jan 22 '12 at 2:04
    
AFAICT this will do the wrong thing for methods that either (a) aren't class methods or (b) don't expect an X instance as their first argument---some kind of inspection is necessary beyond ensuring that the Y attribute is a method to make sure that comes out right. (Unless all Y methods are class methods expecting an X instance.) (But I'll admit that the auto_api jazz is nifty.) –  ben w Jan 22 '12 at 7:52
    
@benw: Indeed - I asume all methods should be affected. Ut if it is not the case, then just use a similar mechanism of introspection - it should be trivial to add. –  jsbueno Jan 22 '12 at 19:10

Not sure if this is what you want, but some introspection/varname discipline can get you somewhere:

import functools

class X(object):
    @property
    def Y(self):
        return YProxy(self)

class Y(object):
    @classmethod
    def method(cls, x_inst, *a):
        print x_inst, a

instancemethod = type(Y.method)

class YProxy(object):
    def __init__(self, x_inst):
        self.x_inst = x_inst
    def __getattr__(self, k):
        obj = getattr(Y, k)
        if isinstance(obj, instancemethod) and obj.func_code.co_varnames[0] == 'cls':
            return functools.partial(obj, self.x_inst)
        return obj

Using cls as the name for the first arg to a class method is generally accepted style, I think. self isn't really appropriate.

ETA: you could also check for a variable name called "x_inst" or something like that if there are other class methods, or use a decorator in the relevant classes to set a property on the methods, &c. The point is that you can do what you need in a __getattr__ if you have some programmatic way of distinguishing which methods need to be supplied with an instance and which don't.

share|improve this answer
import inspect

def callthing():
    my_caller = inspect.stack()[1]
    args, varargs, keywords, locals = inspect.getargvalues(my_caller)
    print args[0]

When the above callthing is invoked, it will get the arguments of its caller (the [1] being "the stack frame above the current one"), printing the first one. You could even use named arguments to "get the value of the argument named x_inst". Perhaps @classmethod should return a function wrapped in a call to something like callthing?

You could also make the branching happen in the decorator itself using inspect.getargspec(my_function), keeping in mind that the actual value the argument is given isn't available at that point, since the function is being constructed rather than called.

share|improve this answer
1  
In python 2, it is better to use inspect.currentframe(1) instead of inspect.stack()[1] - the later takes ages to be processed, to the point it is usually unsuitable to be used in production code. –  jsbueno Jan 22 '12 at 1:54
    
I don't think this can work - the "x" instance is not actually used as parameter in anything in an expression like "x.Y.method()" - the "Y" is retrieved as an attribute of the instance x, but since Y is not a method, the "self" argument is never passed to it. –  jsbueno Jan 22 '12 at 1:57

Why are you linking the classes like this? Surely

>>> class X(object):
...     def __init__(self, y):
...             self.y = y
...     
...     def method(self, *args, **kwargs):
...             self.y.method(self, *args, **kwargs)

>>> class Y(object):
...     @classmethod
...     def method(cls, x, *args):
...             print cls, x, args
... 
>>> y = Y()
>>> x = X(y)
>>> x.method(Ellipsis)
<class '__main__.Y'> <__main__.X object at 0xb727612c> (Ellipsis,)

would work just fine?


What you've asked for is somewhat contradictory. If x.Y really is just the class object Y then certainly it doesn't have this automatic argument binding property that you want. So x.Y must be some sort of proxy object that does the binding for you.

But Python already does precisely this on instance methods of classes already! If you have an instance of X and you call a method on it, that method will receive self as the first argument; you know that. So surely it makes more sense to use that to bind the arguments?

share|improve this answer
    
Y is just one of the classes that I want to access. There is also A, B, C, etc. Essentially, X is an API class, and all the other classes are object based representations of resources return by the api. I'd like to be able to say "api.ResourceA.retrieve(id_)" or "api.ResourceB.all()" –  dave mankoff Jan 21 '12 at 23:02
    
And these resources themselves need an instance of the API class? –  katrielalex Jan 21 '12 at 23:05
    
The resources need to be accessed through the api object (X) which contains authentication details and other generic methods for communicating with the remote server. The resources themselves would be a subclass of something different (APIObject, for instance), but maintain a reference to the api instance that they came from. –  dave mankoff Jan 21 '12 at 23:09

Would it be possible to do something like this instead ?

class X(object):
 def __init__(self):
  self.Y = Y(self)

class Y(object):
 def __init__(self, x):
  self.x = x

 def method1(self, *args, **kwargs):
  pass

x = X()
x.Y.method1()
share|improve this answer

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