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Consider following code:

main.cpp:

#include <iostream>
typedef void ( * fncptr)(void);
extern void externalfunc(void);

template<void( * test)(void)>
class Bar
{
public:
    Bar() { test(); }
};

void localfunc()
{
    std::cout << "Hello World" << std::endl;
}
constexpr fncptr alias = localfunc;
extern fncptr externalAlias;
int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    Bar<localfunc> b;
    Bar<alias> b2; // This wouldn't compile if alias wasn't constexpr
    Bar<externalfunc> b3;
//  Bar<externalAlias> b4;

    return 0;
}

and external.cpp:

#include <iostream>

typedef void ( * fncptr)(void);

void externalfunc()
{
    std::cout << "Hello external world" << std::endl;
}

fncptr externalAlias = externalfunc;

Now the problem is I need something like the 4th line in the main func to work. I get those function declarations from an external C library so I cannot touch those. Currently the 4th line does not compile. gcc 4.6 says "it must be the address of a function with external linkage". In fact it does also say this if you make alias not constexpr, so the actual meaning (I think) should be interpreted as: "I don't know for 100% sure the function address you're giving me is constant which I need for instantiating this template". Is there any way around this as i cannot declare externalalias as constexpr in main.cpp?

Before you come with alternate solutions: I am already trying to get this work by just passing the function pointers through the constructor and save them locally but I am still interested if I could get make the template version to work :).

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1  
How is the compiler supposed to know what the value of externalAlias is so that it can instantiate the template? –  James McNellis Jan 21 '12 at 23:05
    
Yes, it doesn't know that value of externalAlias, but it's a variable and hence it knows the location of that variable at compile-time, so it can template on that. (as seen in another answer (i.e. my answer :-) )). –  Aaron McDaid Jan 22 '12 at 1:21
    
Why do you want to do class specialization with a template? That is what inheritance is for. (i.e. test() should just be a pure virtual method of Bar) And then have implementations of test in the derived classes that correspond to the localfunc, alias, externfunc, etc... Or better yet, Bar is just a standalone class and is passed an instance of and "ITest" class in it's constructor. Doing tricky things with templates just results in unmaintainable code for other to inherit. –  selbie Jan 22 '12 at 1:26
    
@selbie: I do not want to do class specialization, that example was just minimized code to show the problem. The actual problem is in fact a situation where I have 1 kind of resource logic/handling that I need to wrap 3-4 C functions that however have a different function (only name differs, not syntax) for every kind of resource. Currently I was just copy pasting a class for every set of those functions, only replacing class name and the actual functions called, sounds much like manual templating... –  KillianDS Jan 22 '12 at 8:19
    
@KillianDS - I figured as much. Still, it sounds like you are doing something extreme with templates when a strategy pattern with virtual methods and interfaces would likely do. On my product team, templates are heavily discouraged - and with good reason - they can be harder to debug and maintain. And usually some applied use of (interface) inheritance would suffice. I apologize for not actually answering your question. But I just wanted to encourage you to think away from templates and towards something more maintainable. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strategy_pattern –  selbie Jan 22 '12 at 8:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The names alias and externAlias are not functions! They are pointers to functions and as such mutable. You cannot use mutable objects as template arguments because the template arguments need to be resolved at compile time. There are two things you can do, however:

  1. You can create a wrapper calling the potentially aliased function using whatever name you choose to give the wrapper. This can also conveniently adjust the type if there is some level of difference between the function signatures.
  2. You can use a constant pointer to function pointer as template argument: the usual one more level of indirection assumption applies here, too.

All this said, what are you actually trying to achieve? Are you sure you don't just want something like std::function<void(void)>? I realize that this is used for type erasure while you seem to have the opposite target and turn function pointers into unique types. However, the way you go about it seems that this isn't really what you intend to do.

Here is an example of how the second option could look like:

#include <iostream>

extern void f(int);
extern void g(int);

void (*falias)(int) = f;
void (*galias)(int) = g;

template <void (**alias)(int)>
struct foo
{
    void bar() { (*alias)(17); }
};

void f(int x) { std::cout << "f(x)=" << x << "\n"; }
void g(int x) { std::cout << "g(x)=" << x << "\n"; }

int main()
{
    foo<&falias>().bar();
    foo<&galias>().bar();
}

The fact that f() and g() end up being implemented in the same translation unit is entirely immaterial: you can move them somewhere else without any problems.

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I am using a library that has a certain callFlow like "createX, doSomethingWithX, deleteX' but with X different for various purposes. As the logic surrounding those calls is identical for all uses, I tried to put this in a single templatized container and pass those 3 function pointers to that template, reducing the need to copy this functionality for each X. The class type should be unique for each X also (due to some statics). –  KillianDS Jan 22 '12 at 0:03
    
Why can't you use &createX, &doSomethingWithX, &deleteX in this case? These seem to be functions in the library. If they are not but may be aliases (i.e. called via a function pointer) you will have to create some sort of wrapper. ... or use option 2. –  Dietmar Kühl Jan 22 '12 at 0:17
    
I tried it doing like your example and it worked for the localfunc of my original example but not externalfunc. But I'm probably going to go for option 1 and add another wrapper :). –  KillianDS Jan 22 '12 at 0:25

If you're prepared to have to manually annotate the types a little, this is possible. Ultimately, the types of the various objects are subtly different.

I'll write this answer backwards, looking at main first:

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    Bar<void(*)(void) , localfunc> b;
    Bar<void(**)(void), &alias> b2;
    Bar<void(*)(void) , externalfunc> b3;
    Bar<void(**)(void), &externalAlias> b4;

    return 0;
}

You might want to consider typeof(g++) or decltype(c++11) to create the slightly more readable, and perhaps use a macro:

Bar<decltype(&localfunc), localfunc> b;
Bar<decltype(&alias), &alias> b2;
Bar<decltype(&externalfunc), externalfunc> b3;
Bar<decltype(&externalAlias), &externalAlias> b4;

I had to change the Bar template a little:

template<typename T, T t>
class Bar;

so that it can deal with function-pointers and with pointers-to-function-pointers. This requires two specializations:

template<void( * test)(void)>
class Bar<void(*)(void), test>
{
public:
    Bar() { std::cout << "* "; test(); }
};
template<void( ** test)(void)>
class Bar<void(**)(void), test>
{
public:
    Bar() { std::cout << "**"; (*test)(); }
};

It should be possible to add further specializations for other types of function with different parameter types and return types, including even method calls.

I tested this fully on my own machine. Here's a demo (without the external function) on ideone.

Note: With the aliases, the template parameter is the address of the alias, and hence it will take account of any changes that you make to the alias variable at runtime. I guess you'll probably want to make the aliases const. const fncptr alias = localfunc;

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